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Old 05-04-2010, 06:57 PM   #24 (permalink)
VolcomX311
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alizio View Post
just fight ppl.

pretty good workout for fighting.

in my boxing gym when i grew up it was 80% sparring, 15% bags/training and 5% running.... but everything you can learn on the bag/training you can learn sparring, depending on who you are sparring with and what the purpose of the session is.

nothing builds fighting muscles like fighting tho.... seriously... i know it sounds stupid and im prepared for the massive neg reps but alot of ppl waste time doing workouts when they should be fighting...

JMO of course and im very biased by the way i grew up training.

go ahead and flame away.
Technically speaking, that's not an altogether bad idea and the issue can vary person to person. If you want to be a good sprinter, the best thing you can do is field work performing various sprints, but sprinting is almost 100% physical. There is technique involved to maximize different phases of a sprint, but it’s 95% dependent on your physical ability. Therefore, spending most of your time sparring and simply learning technique should be the broad base. When you’re wrestling or rolling with someone, you are stimulating all the relevant muscles to a ground game [this would be the area of functional strength or what I call, manhandle strength]. When you’re standing, whether it be striking, shooting or sprawling you are stimulating all the relevant power structures, the velocity based movements generated from hip flexion, hip extension and hip rotation.

I think weight training is something to consider if you feel you need improvement on certain aspects. If you’re striking technique is solid and you need more power, you can train your hips to generate greater velocity and therefore, faster, harder strikes. The principle is the same when shooting and sprawling. Power snatches and power cleans have a direct translation to a high velocity hip extension aka sprawling or shooting, punching or kicking [hip flexion/hip rotation].

I agree that you simply need to spar a lot, or at least perform a lot of reflex work, because what comes before effective physical capabilities, is your reaction time. Reaction time dictates everything (on the feet at least). If I had to break down a pie graph, I’d say 80% in the ring/matt/cage, 15% power training, 5% functional strength. I’m more in line with the idea that cardio comes with the rolling, wrestling and sparring. That kind of cardio is sport specific, short bursts of power exertion, back to low intensity, back into power exertion and so on. Jogging has it’s place, but in a fight, you’re not in a low intensity situation for 20 min. It’s back & forth, exertion & relaxation, which you get when you’re putting in ring/matt time. That variation of speed & relaxation training effects how well your body utilizes fats & sugars in that situation. Jogging forever, though good, trains your body to utilize fats effectively, but you need to be effectively at metabolizing sugars as well. Anyway, my two cents.
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