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Old 10-15-2010, 12:57 PM   #3 (permalink)
Squirrelfighter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halfraq9 View Post
No disrespect intended but your question is very vague. Its like asking what do I do in a boxing match other than not getting knocked out. The answer is everything. That being said I'll try and give you a place to start.

1) Focus on technique, not strength. What I mean is; watch and look for leverage and balance points. Where are your opponents posts? Are you overbalanced or too high?

2) Work on being in control. Control your opponent's, (and your) position and posture. This takes time to learn. Start with controlling their head and hips. Expand from there.

3) Learn single and double leg takedowns. Again, this will take alot of time and practice.

4) Learn takedown defense. Underhooks and crossfaces are your friend.

5) When you get some of the basics down, ask someone to show you leg riding techniques.

6) Cardio is more important than strength.

Since you're just starting, expect to get owned for awhile. Try not to get frustrated but lose the ego and learn. Ask alot of questions.

Good luck and have fun.
I a lot of great stuff here. But there is a small area I want to expand on.

Developing strength is very important. However, as he said, technique is far more important. Think of it as, you have better technique, relative strength you win. You have better technique, lesser strength, you win. However, if you have equal technique, but don't have any strength, you very well may lose.

That being said, lifting huge amounts of weight really wouldn't be helpful for someone around your size, in your weight class. You want strength, but you don't want to get too big, because then you'd defeat the purpose of the technique if you were too slow to apply it.

I would recommend adding some body weight training to supplement whatever you happened to be doing in wrestling. I expect some BW, lots of cardio and free weight lifting maybe?

BW workouts that come to mind are:
Pull ups. These are the very best workout for developing strength in the back muscles without necessarily building size, they add density to the muscle fibers, adding minimal weight and making the muscles themselves stronger.

Traditional Pushups. The strength benefits to the chest/arms is pretty obvious with these one's they're a staple of jut about all physical fitness routines.

Wall Pushups. These are done by planting the feet on the wall behind and walking up said wall until the hands are planted about 12-18 inches away from the wall with your stomach pointed towards it. Think of it like doing a handstand only leaning against a wall. These are similar in nature to regular pushups, except they apply more weight to the musles being worked, as well as bringing the shoulder/trap muscles more into the equation than a traditional pushup.

All in all, cardio and technique are the most important aspects, but some free weights as well as body weight conditioning can give you a leg up on those others who recognize the importance of technique and wind!
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