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Old 04-04-2007, 08:34 AM   #11 (permalink)
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I'm sorry, but I take exception when I hear or read someone saying that the UFC was the birth of MMA and especially when I hear how Dana White or the Fertitta Brothers created MMA. (Not that I am saying that anyone in this thread has said that. I do understand that people in this thread, especially the original poster was mearly stating they were influencial people in MMA which I am not disputing).

OK, a brief history of MMA ...

One of the earliest forms of widespread unarmed combat sports with minimal rules was Greek pankration, which was introduced into the Olympic games in 648 B.C.
No-holds-barred events reportedly took place in the late 1800s when wrestlers representing a huge range of fighting styles met in tournaments and music-hall challenge matches throughout Europe.
The first major encounter between a boxer and a wrestler in modern times took place in 1887 when John L. Sullivan, then heavyweight boxing champion of the world, entered the ring with his trainer, the Greco-Roman wrestling champion, William Muldoon, and was slammed to the mat in two minutes. The next publicized encounter occurred in the late 1890s when future heavyweight boxing champion Bob Fitzsimmons took on European Greco-Roman wrestling champion Ernest Roeber. Reportedly, Roeber suffered a fractured cheekbone in this bout, but was able to get Fitzsimmons down on the mat, where he applied an arm lock and made the boxer submit. In 1936, heavyweight boxing contender Kingfish Levinsky and the veteran professional wrestler Ray Steele competed in a mixed match, which Steele won in 35 seconds. In all three of these 'mixed-matches', the wrestler won. (So much for the Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki match in 1976 being the first)
Another early example of MMA combat was the martial art of Bartitsu, founded in London in 1899, which was the first martial art known to have combined Asian and European fighting styles and which saw MMA-style contests throughout England, pitting European and Japanese champions against representatives of various European wrestling styles. (So much for the theory that Bruce Lee developed the first MMA fighting style with Jeet Kune Do.)
Boxing vs. jujitsu contests were popular entertainments throughout Europe, Japan and the Pacific Rim during the early years of the 1900s. In Japan these contests were known as Merikan. Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules including points decision, best of three throws or knock-downs, and knock-out/submission.
Modern mixed martial arts are rooted in two interconnected movements. First were the vale tudo events in Brazil, followed by the Japanese shoot wrestling shows. Vale tudo (meaning 'anything goes') began in the 1920s with the famous "Gracie challenge" issued by Carlos Gracie and Hélio Gracie and upheld later on by descendants of the Gracie family. In Japan in the 1970s, a series of mixed martial arts matches were hosted by Antonio Inoki, inspiring the shoot-style movement in Japanese professional wrestling, which eventually led to the formation of the first mixed martial arts organizations, such as Shooto, which was formed in 1985. (1985, hmmm that beats the UFC by 8 years and it beats the Fertitta owned UFC by 16 years).
PRIDE Fighting Championships was initially conceived in 1997 by Kakutougi Revolution Spirits to match popular Japanese pro-wrestler Nobuhiko Takada with Rickson Gracie, the purported champion of the Gracie family of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioners. The event, held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997 attracted 47,000 fans, as well as Japanese mass media attention. The success of the first event enabled its promoters to hold a regular series of mixed martial arts events, and a year later in 1998, promote a rematch between Takada and Gracie. With K-1 enjoying popularity in Japan, PRIDE began to compete with monthly showings on Fuji Television, as well as pay per view on the newly formed satellite television channel SKY PerfecTV. (Couldn't talk about MMA without mentioning Pride which enjoyed immediate popularity and never was saddled with the "Bloodsport" stigma that UFC and other US based companys faced in North America)
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Old 04-04-2007, 08:45 AM   #12 (permalink)
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I do however have to take issue with this statement...

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Elemental Warrio
5. The Fertittas: They rolled the dice and came up big. They have turned this sport from a bloodsport being held in dingy convention centers, into the biggest draw in Vegas.
The International Fighting Championships became the first MMA promotion to enact rules that were recognized by a state athletic commission (Mississippi/1996). These rules have since been adopted by California, New Jersey, Louisiana, and Nevada. In Canada, the country that had once banned these events due to misinformation, the IFC rules are also the official rules for the province of Québec and IFC events have been viewed across Canada. IFC shows on RDS in Canada were the first to be a regularly scheduled MMA weekly network program anywhere in the world.
the International Fighting Championships secured the first U.S. sanctioned mixed martial arts event, which occurred in New Jersey on September 30, 2000.
UFC 28: High Stakes held on November 17, 2000 at the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City, New Jersey was the first UFC event to be sanctioned by the New Jersey State Athletic Control Board, held under the newly formed "Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts".
(The UFC had already turned itself around and had already held a major sanctioned event at the Trump Taj Mahal [hardly a dingy convention center] prior to the Fertitta's purchasing the company, so they didn't turn anything around. They were able to, thanks to Lorenzo Fertitta ties to the Nevada State Athletic Commission, secure sanctioning in Nevada in 2001 and it was shortly thereafter, at UFC 33, the UFC returned to pay-per-view cable television. What I will give them credit for is the major explosion in popularity of MMA in the United States. This was due to their idea for the Ultimate Fighter reality TV series and their being willing to risk $10 million dollars to get it on the air. At this point the UFC was still losing money, so this was a major risk and you are right, they scored big time).
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Old 04-04-2007, 11:59 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Bruce Lee? Wasn't he an actor who had his own martial art style? Didn't know he was an MMA fighter or had anything to do with the sport today.
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Old 04-04-2007, 12:48 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRandy
I'm sorry, but I take exception when I hear or read someone saying that the UFC was the birth of MMA and especially when I hear how Dana White or the Fertitta Brothers created MMA. (Not that I am saying that anyone in this thread has said that. I do understand that people in this thread, especially the original poster was mearly stating they were influencial people in MMA which I am not disputing).

OK, a brief history of MMA ...

One of the earliest forms of widespread unarmed combat sports with minimal rules was Greek pankration, which was introduced into the Olympic games in 648 B.C.
No-holds-barred events reportedly took place in the late 1800s when wrestlers representing a huge range of fighting styles met in tournaments and music-hall challenge matches throughout Europe.
The first major encounter between a boxer and a wrestler in modern times took place in 1887 when John L. Sullivan, then heavyweight boxing champion of the world, entered the ring with his trainer, the Greco-Roman wrestling champion, William Muldoon, and was slammed to the mat in two minutes. The next publicized encounter occurred in the late 1890s when future heavyweight boxing champion Bob Fitzsimmons took on European Greco-Roman wrestling champion Ernest Roeber. Reportedly, Roeber suffered a fractured cheekbone in this bout, but was able to get Fitzsimmons down on the mat, where he applied an arm lock and made the boxer submit. In 1936, heavyweight boxing contender Kingfish Levinsky and the veteran professional wrestler Ray Steele competed in a mixed match, which Steele won in 35 seconds. In all three of these 'mixed-matches', the wrestler won. (So much for the Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki match in 1976 being the first)
Another early example of MMA combat was the martial art of Bartitsu, founded in London in 1899, which was the first martial art known to have combined Asian and European fighting styles and which saw MMA-style contests throughout England, pitting European and Japanese champions against representatives of various European wrestling styles. (So much for the theory that Bruce Lee developed the first MMA fighting style with Jeet Kune Do.)
Boxing vs. jujitsu contests were popular entertainments throughout Europe, Japan and the Pacific Rim during the early years of the 1900s. In Japan these contests were known as Merikan. Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules including points decision, best of three throws or knock-downs, and knock-out/submission.
Modern mixed martial arts are rooted in two interconnected movements. First were the vale tudo events in Brazil, followed by the Japanese shoot wrestling shows. Vale tudo (meaning 'anything goes') began in the 1920s with the famous "Gracie challenge" issued by Carlos Gracie and Hélio Gracie and upheld later on by descendants of the Gracie family. In Japan in the 1970s, a series of mixed martial arts matches were hosted by Antonio Inoki, inspiring the shoot-style movement in Japanese professional wrestling, which eventually led to the formation of the first mixed martial arts organizations, such as Shooto, which was formed in 1985. (1985, hmmm that beats the UFC by 8 years and it beats the Fertitta owned UFC by 16 years).
PRIDE Fighting Championships was initially conceived in 1997 by Kakutougi Revolution Spirits to match popular Japanese pro-wrestler Nobuhiko Takada with Rickson Gracie, the purported champion of the Gracie family of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioners. The event, held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997 attracted 47,000 fans, as well as Japanese mass media attention. The success of the first event enabled its promoters to hold a regular series of mixed martial arts events, and a year later in 1998, promote a rematch between Takada and Gracie. With K-1 enjoying popularity in Japan, PRIDE began to compete with monthly showings on Fuji Television, as well as pay per view on the newly formed satellite television channel SKY PerfecTV. (Couldn't talk about MMA without mentioning Pride which enjoyed immediate popularity and never was saddled with the "Bloodsport" stigma that UFC and other US based companys faced in North America)
Good points, that what i meant by Martial artists of all centuries, greeks, mix tournaments...etc. However you have to take note that during Lee's time, martial artists were so proud in their own styles that they look down on the others'. So Lee didn't come up with the idea, he helped revive it.
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Old 04-04-2007, 05:45 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Elemental Warrio
Good points, that what i meant by Martial artists of all centuries, greeks, mix tournaments...etc. However you have to take note that during Lee's time, martial artists were so proud in their own styles that they look down on the others'. So Lee didn't come up with the idea, he helped revive it.
Good to see that someone sees what has been addressed. When it comes to Lee, most Martial Arts enthusiasts are usually too far on the extreme ends of the spectrum when they view his influence. Either they view him as a sham or fake because he became famous through Hollywood/Hong Kong movies, or they view him as the second coming embodied who came down and set all the TMA practitioners free of their styles while completely re-inventing the combat arts as we know it. The truth is that he falls someplace in between.
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Old 04-04-2007, 06:12 PM   #16 (permalink)
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No particular order

Dana White
Frank Fertita
Lorenzo Fertita
Rorion Gracie
Royce Gracie
Bas Rutten
Dan Severn
Bruce Lee
Ken Shamrock
Sakuraba

As, far as bruce lee goes... he was one of the few people back in the day that mixed styles. Not only that, the fact that he was an actor and had alot of fans meant every one heard about Jeet Kune Do. So even if he didn't INVENT MMA he let people know about the importance of mixing martial arts (in america) and set the stage for the success of organizatons like the UFC.

Tito Ortiz... are you kidding? No offense but the guys was a little punk with out any real skills. He can wrestle a little, and he was an agressive puncher. That's all. The only reason he was so successful is because for some reason people like fighters who talk shit.

By the way. Good job Big Randy. I wrote like a fifteen page paper on MMA for a sociology course and your post was a very condensed version of that. All though those were all early forms of MMA competition the most influential figures in MODERN MMA were different. See, despite all of those competitions and such MMA never really became popular. For instance, even though it became clear that wrestlers beat boxers, boxing remained much more popular in America. I think my ten are responsible for spreading MMA in the world, more specificly the western world, and even more specificly America. And Amercia has been a womb for MMA's growth since the formation of the UFC. it is now becoming a mainstream sport.
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Old 04-05-2007, 01:27 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy GNP
No particular order

Tito Ortiz... are you kidding? No offense but the guys was a little punk with out any real skills. He can wrestle a little, and he was an agressive puncher. That's all. The only reason he was so successful is because for some reason people like fighters who talk shit.
.
WOW And the fact that Tito beat most of the fighters the UFC put in front of him? Wait wasn't he world champion at one point i don't know maybe i'm wrong
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Old 04-05-2007, 12:17 PM   #18 (permalink)
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This is coming from a self confessed Shamrock fan and Tito hater......Tito has to be in there. Love him or hate him he was the face of the rebirth of mma in the modern era. To claim he has no skills is ridiculous, he's a great fighter(albeit boring fighter) who has a great record against some fierce competition........I feel dirty now but i had to say it
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Old 04-06-2007, 04:38 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Im still trying to come up with my list for this thread, but I am a bit confused. Are we saying influential as in their accomplishments somehow changes MMA for the better or is it about popularity, as in they helped make MMA more popular? (and yes that is for the better, but I hardly find that significant to call them influenetial). example (not MMA) David Caradine played Kwai Chang Caine (grasshopper) in the 70's tv series Kung Fu. At the time, the man had absolutely no martial arts training, but, helped to make the martial arts popular in the United States. So, does that make David Caradine an influential figure in martial arts? I hope not. But I can even stretch this example question a little thinner and say since David Caradine helped to make the martial arts popular, and since Mixed Martial Arts is derived from that, can we then say that David Caradine helped make MMA popular and thus should be considered an influential figure in MMA? OK, that is getting pretty thin, but that is where I am having my problem making my list. anyway, end of example... Also, it looks to me that alot (not all) the posts, when they refer to MMA they are only talking about the UFC and they are limiting the discussion to America or North America. I find it hard to think of MMA and not atleast think of Japan and Brazil. And I have come to take this thread as meaning Modern MMA, the sport we enjoy today.
Hmmmm this is a hard thread to do justice to. But I definately like this thread and look foreward to reading more peoples ideas concerning this.
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Old 04-06-2007, 05:13 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy GNP
Tito Ortiz... are you kidding? No offense but the guys was a little punk with out any real skills. He can wrestle a little, and he was an agressive puncher. That's all. The only reason he was so successful is because for some reason people like fighters who talk shit.

dude i dont know who this post is directed too... but this thread is a question based on 1's opinion, therefore you cant tell people who and who they havent been inspired by, stopp raggin on the guy. and as you can see people have many names on there lists that havent even fought mma before... inspiration doesnt just come from a fighters in ring performance lol, outside personality has alot too do with it too.... you can say what you want about tito, he talks shit cus he hypes fights up sells tickets , makes money simple . if you think hes like that outside of the octagon and outside of work, your an idiot. no offense
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