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Old 10-14-2007, 11:27 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onganju
Hey Don, you doing subs only or are you doing MMA? Reason I ask is that I've found a quick way to break a Wrestler of that habit (aside from showing you can submit off your back), is to let them turtle up and box them around the ears a bit. Nothing too hard, just enough to show him another reason not to give up your back.

Other than that, a lot of drilling will need to be done to help "re-wire" his normal habits. Arm him with a set of sweeps and escapes first. Those will play into his wrestler mentality a lot easier than teaching him how to submit. Once he gets confident in his ability to get out from under his opponent, then start throwing in submissions from the bottom in bite-size portions. That way you aren't working against his wrestling background, but you'd be working an adjusted approach in conjunction to his wrestling background.
Well MMA, the kids 19, Stong as an ox.. and quick hands... also wrestled in high school... went to the states. He just lacks submission and really has never studied GnP, which is mainly what I need to work on him with those two areas. While I personally have MA tourney experience It was not true MMA even though there was striking and grappling involved.. THere were ALOT more rules.. He is the first I am training for this.. SO Any advice (those that know me on here) You know I will take to heart... Plus if anyone is in the Middle TN (Nashville) area or will be passing through... let me know..
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Old 10-14-2007, 03:42 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Don
Well MMA, the kids 19, Stong as an ox.. and quick hands... also wrestled in high school... went to the states. He just lacks submission and really has never studied GnP, which is mainly what I need to work on him with those two areas. While I personally have MA tourney experience It was not true MMA even though there was striking and grappling involved.. THere were ALOT more rules.. He is the first I am training for this.. SO Any advice (those that know me on here) You know I will take to heart... Plus if anyone is in the Middle TN (Nashville) area or will be passing through... let me know..
The best advice I can give you as far as training guys is something that I've learned from a long time as a student: kick his ass.

The best coaches I've had, the guys I'm working with now, are always pushing me. They try and get me to break down, try and get me to wear out and give up. The circuits are ridiculous and the training sessions are intense. Knowing that they can't break me makes that much more confident and that much stronger. When they do get me to pass out or throw up, I know I need to work harder.

My best advice for a guy transitioning from wrestling is to get him in the gi. Make him think like a jiu-jitsu fighter, as well as a wrestler. If he thinks he can fall back on his wrestling skills, he will. Show him that it's not ok to do that.

Also work on putting him in the worst position. Carlos Valente has a policy about his MMA fighters. He doesn't let them fight until they can handle the worst positions. If you're guy gets hit and stunned and ends up in a bad position, make sure he can regain his composure and get back in the game. Make sure he doesn't feel like he has to give up.

Make sure that, as a wrestler, he uses lots of leg kicks and is aware of his opponents leg kicks. Alot of grapplers forget that they are dealing with strikers and get worn down slowly by an opponent playing away from them and breaking down their lower body. The best strategy for a wrestler is to slow down the opponents leg movement with legkicks and put him on his back. That's the way to go.

As far as really getting him ready to fight, it's all about Nietzsche: that which doesn't destroy me makes me stronger. Pound on him and pick apart his game until all he's got left are his fundamentals and build from the ground up.

If you want some more technical advice, feel free to post some video so we can take a look. A few guys have been pming that kind of stuff.
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Old 10-14-2007, 03:56 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IronMan
The best advice I can give you as far as training guys is something that I've learned from a long time as a student: kick his ass.

The best coaches I've had, the guys I'm working with now, are always pushing me. They try and get me to break down, try and get me to wear out and give up. The circuits are ridiculous and the training sessions are intense. Knowing that they can't break me makes that much more confident and that much stronger. When they do get me to pass out or throw up, I know I need to work harder.

My best advice for a guy transitioning from wrestling is to get him in the gi. Make him think like a jiu-jitsu fighter, as well as a wrestler. If he thinks he can fall back on his wrestling skills, he will. Show him that it's not ok to do that.

Also work on putting him in the worst position. Carlos Valente has a policy about his MMA fighters. He doesn't let them fight until they can handle the worst positions. If you're guy gets hit and stunned and ends up in a bad position, make sure he can regain his composure and get back in the game. Make sure he doesn't feel like he has to give up.

Make sure that, as a wrestler, he uses lots of leg kicks and is aware of his opponents leg kicks. Alot of grapplers forget that they are dealing with strikers and get worn down slowly by an opponent playing away from them and breaking down their lower body. The best strategy for a wrestler is to slow down the opponents leg movement with legkicks and put him on his back. That's the way to go.

As far as really getting him ready to fight, it's all about Nietzsche: that which doesn't destroy me makes me stronger. Pound on him and pick apart his game until all he's got left are his fundamentals and build from the ground up.

If you want some more technical advice, feel free to post some video so we can take a look. A few guys have been pming that kind of stuff.
THis leads me to another problem. While I have many years of training under my belt. I have been off my training the last 3 years. Basicly while I remember the moves, know how to apply them and all that.. my reflexs and my own body and conditioning are not what it used to be. Not the best of ways to start off training someone 11 years younger then myself. Thing is I see this kid as having lots of potential.. I guess part of this will be getting myself back into shape...
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Old 10-14-2007, 05:05 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Don
THis leads me to another problem. While I have many years of training under my belt. I have been off my training the last 3 years. Basicly while I remember the moves, know how to apply them and all that.. my reflexs and my own body and conditioning are not what it used to be. Not the best of ways to start off training someone 11 years younger then myself. Thing is I see this kid as having lots of potential.. I guess part of this will be getting myself back into shape...
While it might be good to get you back into shape, as an instructor it's not your job to be his training partner. My coaches roll with me sometimes, but usually I roll with other guys and they watch so that they can push my technique.

Find your guy some training partners. That's something that alot of fighters really need. Four is a pretty good number for getting guys started. Ideally they'd all be similar weight wise with some variation in build and skill set. That doesn't always happen, and if you end up with 4 wrestlers than you have to focus on coaching their other skills, as their wrestling will improve no matter what.

That said, doing circuit training is something that you need to watch your fighter do, not do with him. The same is true for rolling and sparring. Watch at a distance to see where he is making mistakes. It's fine to do it sometimes, but watching helps alot more than when you have to be conscious of your own body as well.

There's a reason the team concept is so popular: because it gives the coach a chance to watch fighters as they work with other fighters. Find your guy some training partners. It's fine to work on your conditioning a little to, but keep that on the side. If you're going to coach your fighters then coach, if you're going to train, train. It's usually best to focus on one thing at a time.
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Old 10-21-2007, 03:39 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IronMan
While it might be good to get you back into shape, as an instructor it's not your job to be his training partner. My coaches roll with me sometimes, but usually I roll with other guys and they watch so that they can push my technique.

Find your guy some training partners. That's something that alot of fighters really need. Four is a pretty good number for getting guys started. Ideally they'd all be similar weight wise with some variation in build and skill set. That doesn't always happen, and if you end up with 4 wrestlers than you have to focus on coaching their other skills, as their wrestling will improve no matter what.

That said, doing circuit training is something that you need to watch your fighter do, not do with him. The same is true for rolling and sparring. Watch at a distance to see where he is making mistakes. It's fine to do it sometimes, but watching helps alot more than when you have to be conscious of your own body as well.

There's a reason the team concept is so popular: because it gives the coach a chance to watch fighters as they work with other fighters. Find your guy some training partners. It's fine to work on your conditioning a little to, but keep that on the side. If you're going to coach your fighters then coach, if you're going to train, train. It's usually best to focus on one thing at a time.
Hmm you know good point and we have started looking for other people who want train weather to compete or just cause they want to train. thanks for the advice.
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