MMA Forum - UFC Forums - UFC Results - MMA Videos

MMA Forum - UFC Forums - UFC Results - MMA Videos (http://www.mmaforum.com/)
-   The Lounge (http://www.mmaforum.com/lounge/)
-   -   There is a intruder in the Highschool *Read this and go wtf* (http://www.mmaforum.com/lounge/96267-there-intruder-highschool-read-go-wtf.html)

M_D 10-27-2011 12:48 AM

There is a intruder in the Highschool *Read this and go wtf*
 
http://articles.courant.com/2011-10-...-dogs-lockdown

Quote:

At Wolcott High School one morning this week, an urgent announcement crackled over the intercom: a threatening intruder was in the building and students were told to immediately take refuge in classrooms.

Doors were locked and police, with dogs, moved in. Students stayed huddled in classrooms where they were told to stay away from the windows.



But what sounded like a frightening situation was just a search for narcotics. Drug-sniffing dogs combed the school while students stayed in locked classrooms, believing that an attacker was roaming the halls.

Drug-free schools are an admirable goal but I wonder when we reached the point where the war on drugs justifies police searches under the ruse of a Virginia Tech-style attack.

What on earth could authorities in Wolcott be thinking?

School officials told me it was a routine lockdown drill, the kind that schools are required to do.

"We wanted to practice,'' said Superintendent of Schools Joseph McCary. "We said there was a lockdown with an intruder inside. Doors are locked, shades are drawn and the lights are turned off and students are told to move to a corner of the room."

"After 10 minutes we say this is a drill and at that point we started a search for drugs,'' McCary said. "We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment."

No drugs turned up in the search. An email from the high school to parents explained the event, without mentioning the intruder story. It was described as a "lockdown intervention drill" where "two police dogs swept the hallway lockers, locker rooms and the student parking lot.''

Bringing in police dogs to search for drugs in student lockers, while not common, isn't the real outrage here. It's understandable why adults feel they must do something about drug abuse. It's the trickery and tactics that seem more suited to a police sting operation than a public school.

"I don't think the school administration and police department have any right to mislead these kids, under any circumstances, to conduct a public safety drill," said Carl Glendening, a parent of two high school students. "The kids are told there is an intruder and there is a lockdown and then they see cops coming in with dogs."

"Some kids were freaked out by it. The notion of Columbine was in the back of their minds,'' Glendening said. "We didn't think this through clearly."

"They are kids. They are students. They are not there to be used."

Andrew Schneider, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut, called it a "terrible policy. It will cause more trouble in the long run. Young people will learn not to trust the police."

"It's a terrible civics lesson."

While state law requires schools to have regular emergency drills, drug-sniffing-dog searches are up to the individual school district. Canton schools recently attracted attention for surprise drug searches using dogs.


"The whole issue of search and seizure, you have to have reasonable suspicion, such as if they have had other issues in where the administration feels there's a drug problem in the school,'' said Vincent Mustaro of the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education. "This is one of those policies we consider optional."

School officials say it's not as if they think there's a drug problem in Wolcott. Bringing the dogs in "is precautionary," said school board Chairwoman Patricia Najarian, who added that she didn't see a problem with the fake intruder story.

"Maybe there's a few people who get nervous. When we say it's a surprise drill, it's a surprise drill,'' she said. "We have a very active group of citizens against substance abuse."

The drug search is "something that is good to do periodically. It says we don't have drugs in the school,'' she said. "Either way it's a win-win. I know people get concerned there seems to be an overreaction."

McCary, the Wolcott superintendent, said they want to teach students to take their safety seriously, so making them think it was real was essential. "If you say it's just a drill, would you move as quickly?"

He makes a point, except that we don't set fires to get students to take fire drills more seriously. There's also another issue. If you say something important to teenagers and you want them to trust you, it's better not to lie.


Hammerlock2.0 10-29-2011 09:06 AM

I have the sudden urge to make a bomb threat to the guys who did this just to call back 10 minutes later to tell them it was just a drill.

UFC_OWNS 10-29-2011 09:18 AM

Heard this on the Joe Rogan Experience, assholes

joshua7789 10-29-2011 12:16 PM

That is messed up. I would pull my kid out of that school. That is not the kind of shit you should lie to a large group of kids about. That is an easy way to cause a mass panic that could lead to a frenzy. Large groups of people are stupid and often unpredictable with how off the wall and crazy they can get.

Scarecrow 10-29-2011 12:24 PM

That's the U.S. Department of Education for you.

The biggest sack of crap we have in our government.

Roflcopter 10-31-2011 12:12 PM

This is not a big deal. When I was in HS they had a similar thing going on....there was no panic as we are never panicked and everyone knew basically what was going on after a few minutes. They did a drug search for about 3 hours.

Again...not a big deal at all. They have practice lockdowns all the time and the schools are better off for them. The worst thing that could happen is an actual emergency takes place and everyone is hysteric and running all over the place.

Of course, it is important not to go over the top. Here in my district we have codes with a certain inference to them. They pretty much call out the level code and tell the students to stick with procedure, lock the doors and remain inside. No one panics, etc.

Now if they had gone on intercom and said "Hey there's an intruder! Hide!" Then yeah...people might get nervous.

joshua7789 10-31-2011 01:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roflcopter (Post 1495911)
This is not a big deal. When I was in HS they had a similar thing going on....there was no panic as we are never panicked and everyone knew basically what was going on after a few minutes. They did a drug search for about 3 hours.

Again...not a big deal at all. They have practice lockdowns all the time and the schools are better off for them. The worst thing that could happen is an actual emergency takes place and everyone is hysteric and running all over the place.

Of course, it is important not to go over the top. Here in my district we have codes with a certain inference to them. They pretty much call out the level code and tell the students to stick with procedure, lock the doors and remain inside. No one panics, etc.

Now if they had gone on intercom and said "Hey there's an intruder! Hide!" Then yeah...people might get nervous.

That doesnt really excuse the tactic of lying to the students. It seems like something out of a George Owell novel. I dont believe in lying to the people, even if they are high school students.

Roflcopter 10-31-2011 11:42 PM

You weren't there. You have no idea what the procedure was.

Any slant can be put on a story to make a story, or to suit someone's agenda.

As I stated before, this happened when I was in HS and it's not a big deal. It's called a drill for a reason.

The school does a fire drill no one goes "OMG you told us there was a fire! You LIARS!".

Same principle.

joshua7789 11-02-2011 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roflcopter (Post 1496167)
You weren't there. You have no idea what the procedure was.

Any slant can be put on a story to make a story, or to suit someone's agenda.

As I stated before, this happened when I was in HS and it's not a big deal. It's called a drill for a reason.

The school does a fire drill no one goes "OMG you told us there was a fire! You LIARS!".

Same principle.

Thats not the same principal in any way. They are blatantly lying to the students in order to search their lockers and try to catch them off guard, not practicing for a bad situation. I understand the concept of a social contract, but outright lies are uncalled for when it comes to the relationship between the powers that be and the people. It is one thing to withhold information, it is completely different to lie to their faces.

Roflcopter 11-02-2011 04:48 PM

There isn't enough information to make that judgment. If the protocol was even remotely similar to how my district handled these same drug searches no one has any right to complain.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:09 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.8 , Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2