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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-08-2012, 09:25 AM Thread Starter
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*Help* Steps to become successful in MMA??

Hello Everyone! I'm new to these forums and MMA/Martial Arts in general. I'm 16 and in high school. I'm athletically inclined and have respectable lift weights with near perfect form. Bench 225, Squat 315, Deadlift 410.

My ultimate goal would to succeed in MMA. I have a few questions. Feel free to share your opinion's and advice.



Advice already given to me. Feel free to disagree and give reason with why the below thoughts are incorrect.

1. *From my understanding, it is better to do a single MA; then, you become recruited/go to a MMA gym and train there.*

2. *There are four main MA's to get into MMA: wrestling, boxing, kickboxing, and judo."*

3. *Muay Thai is a very well-rounded art that would carry over into MMA very well.*

Questions

1.) Is Muay Thai practical for someone with NO previous MA expirience? Is it an excellent option for pre-MMA training?
Would it be better to start with boxing/wrestling before/instead of MT? (I'm not trying to do art vs. art.)

2.) About how long should I expect it to take before fighting becomes more natural? Around 6 months?

3.) Should I do MT + BJJ -> MMA? MT -> MMA? Wrestling -> Boxing -> MMA? Just MMA? Please enlighten me on a quick, successful path.


I'll add more questions if I think of any.


Thanks so much for the help in advance!

Last edited by Narkin; 04-08-2012 at 01:07 PM.
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-09-2012, 05:00 PM Thread Starter
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125+ views and no help? Please help me guys!
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-09-2012, 05:07 PM
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I'm by no means an expert in MMA, but if you're 16 and live in the US, start wrestling ASAP.

There are good guys here, especially when it comes to training and fighting, I'm sure you'll get some quality advice.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-09-2012, 06:05 PM
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Go to a gym that teaches all of the above. Talk with the trainers and let them know what you want to do. Try all the classes. They will lay a plan out for you. Then go from there. A good "MMA" class will cover everything but will not focus on one thing unless you want it to.

Yes taking seperate classes will have you doing one thing at a time. But you may not have the time to be at the gym 6 hours a day like some are.

I have had success doing just 3 MMA classes a week and sparing/rolling while Im not at class or waiting for the next class with my trainers and partners. Mind you I would show up 3 hours before a class to do that.

Bottom line you need time



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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leed View Post
I'm by no means an expert in MMA, but if you're 16 and live in the US, start wrestling ASAP.

There are good guys here, especially when it comes to training and fighting, I'm sure you'll get some quality advice.
Thanks for the input!


Quote:
Originally Posted by G_Land View Post
Go to a gym that teaches all of the above. Talk with the trainers and let them know what you want to do. Try all the classes. They will lay a plan out for you. Then go from there. A good "MMA" class will cover everything but will not focus on one thing unless you want it to.

Yes taking seperate classes will have you doing one thing at a time. But you may not have the time to be at the gym 6 hours a day like some are.

I have had success doing just 3 MMA classes a week and sparing/rolling while Im not at class or waiting for the next class with my trainers and partners. Mind you I would show up 3 hours before a class to do that.

Bottom line you need time
Thanks for the very detailed post! I'll follow your instructions and go from there.

Thanks!
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-12-2012, 07:32 AM
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Do you guys think it's best to just go straight into an MMA class and train everything, or to take up a martial art or two for a while and get good at them before tying it all together with MMA?
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-12-2012, 04:47 PM Thread Starter
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Do you guys think it's best to just go straight into an MMA class and train everything, or to take up a martial art or two for a while and get good at them before tying it all together with MMA?
+1 (I'm curious)
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-15-2012, 03:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigC View Post
Do you guys think it's best to just go straight into an MMA class and train everything, or to take up a martial art or two for a while and get good at them before tying it all together with MMA?
Find a (respectable) MMA gym around where you live and just go there. Most places teach seperate classes for a bunch of MA as well as actual MMA classes.

Try a bit of everything, then talk to the people at the gym about what they think you should start off with.

When you've tried the different MAs and you have to professional's input as well, you can focus on what you find interesting as well as what they believe make a good base.

I was boxing way before I knew of MMA, but when I first went to a MMA gym I started out with kickboxing and what some people call submission wrestling (Which is basically wrestling with submissions mixed in there)

These days all I do is BJJ because that's what I find the most interesting and it's more of a hobby to me now (Plus a great way to stay fit)

What I'm trying to say here is - Do what you find challenging and exciting, that way you won't burn out in the long run




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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-17-2012, 04:02 AM
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You're 16 and you deadlift 400+ and bench 225...what are you on...hahah! To be competitive in anything your mind has to be just as sharp and stronag as you are physically. I don't think physical attributes or learning a martial art will be a problem at all. These days everybody wants to be a "fighter" but is this really what you want or is it just a fad. That's what you gotta ask yourself because frankly not many people your age know what they want.

Scenario: You train at a gym, after a couple of years you get your first amateur fight. You win then you join a smaller org...win some more then you go to TUF. You lose...now what.

When I disect the life of a fighter...I have to say it's on a par with being a soldier in the military. Life span is so short with wayyy too many variables. Anybody can be a fighter, but can you become a champion.

What I'm trying to say is you need to have a plan mapped out. Nothing in life is easy.

So write out your goals from now to three years, five years, then ten. It's difficult to plan beyond 10 but it's a start. Also is your family willing to support you because training is extremely expensive and you WILL NOT make money for a very long time UNTIL you make it into the big leagues.

Kamikaze and some other fighters on the board can tell you straight up how hard it is. I never knew til I watched the fighters in our gym train. It's a full time gig if not at least a part time one with no means of income unless you're working on the side.

Best story is Anderson Silva and GSP. The former almost quit til Big Nog encouraged him. Can you imagine that. The latter worked as a club bouncer and garbage man. Humble beginnings.

Hope this doesn't deter you, but makes you think with more clarity.

Marcus Aurelius: Tell me again, Maximus, why are we here?
Maximus: For the glory of the Empire, sire.

Baked, not fried... the healthy choice.

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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-19-2012, 05:19 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No_Mercy View Post
You're 16 and you deadlift 400+ and bench 225...what are you on...hahah! To be competitive in anything your mind has to be just as sharp and stronag as you are physically. I don't think physical attributes or learning a martial art will be a problem at all. These days everybody wants to be a "fighter" but is this really what you want or is it just a fad. That's what you gotta ask yourself because frankly not many people your age know what they want.

Scenario: You train at a gym, after a couple of years you get your first amateur fight. You win then you join a smaller org...win some more then you go to TUF. You lose...now what.

When I disect the life of a fighter...I have to say it's on a par with being a soldier in the military. Life span is so short with wayyy too many variables. Anybody can be a fighter, but can you become a champion.

What I'm trying to say is you need to have a plan mapped out. Nothing in life is easy.

So write out your goals from now to three years, five years, then ten. It's difficult to plan beyond 10 but it's a start. Also is your family willing to support you because training is extremely expensive and you WILL NOT make money for a very long time UNTIL you make it into the big leagues.

Kamikaze and some other fighters on the board can tell you straight up how hard it is. I never knew til I watched the fighters in our gym train. It's a full time gig if not at least a part time one with no means of income unless you're working on the side.

Best story is Anderson Silva and GSP. The former almost quit til Big Nog encouraged him. Can you imagine that. The latter worked as a club bouncer and garbage man. Humble beginnings.

Hope this doesn't deter you, but makes you think with more clarity.
Wow, I didn't realize how tough it would be. Thanks for giving me the heads up!

Great response and advice.
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