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holyburd 08-07-2012 11:10 PM

Questions on training.
 
I am a new student at Roufusport MMA Academy. I am working Muay Thai Kickboxing and BJJ. I am only 5-6 classes in, but my bjj isn't so good to everyone elses. Obviously, some of the people have been training there for a while, but what kind of tips could you guys offer to a new guy in bjj?? Also, my trainign days usually consist of Muay Thai first for an hour, then bjj after for another hour. Would you recommend I train separate days? BJJ first because of the demanding nature? or is what I am doing just fine?

mrmatt 09-29-2012 09:19 AM

There isn't really any magical ways to get good at BJJ. It all come down to the number of hours you put on the mats. I can't tell you much about MMA since I'm new too, but since I've been in the BJJ communauty for about a year and a half, let me tell you something: Just focus on the basic.

Basic knowledge is what you should focus on, if you try new techniques and fancy stuff everytime, you'll just forget it when you grapple. Have an escape or two for every position, find a couple of submissions you like and work on it. Also, focus on using THE LESS STRENGH you possibly use. That way you're technique will get much better and you'll be able to take on bigger and stronger guys.

And remember, BJJ is way more complex than it seems, you'll probably be in the "I suck" zone for 1-2 years before you start being "just okay".

Voiceless 09-29-2012 11:50 AM

If the Muay Thai training is pretty demanding (which it should be), then I's recommend training your BJJ on different days - at least as a beginner. The reason is that if you're exhausted by the MT training your brain won't be able to fully concentrate anymore. This is really bad for learning new stuff. You won't have full focus and won't execute the techniques properly. That way you will naturalise sloppy technique, because your body and brain just trained sloppy technique. It won't correct it by itself, but memorise what you did and that's sloppy technique. For a beginner it is very important to learn clean and propper technique to get a good technical base.

Later when you're more advanced you can do multiple demanding lessons consecutively, as it's more about using your technique in pratice than learning completely new stuff.

FBrown 11-22-2012 03:43 AM

First of all, this is just advice from me personally. I've been training in BJJ for 2 years total and Muay Thai for a little more than that but I did Boxing/Wrestling before that so I know what it's like to train hard. Here is my advice. For starters, there is no too much or too little. If you can only get in there 1 day a month then do it. If you can get in there 7 days a week, twice a day then do that as well. As far as the order goes, either order is going to be beneficial and here's how. Either way, you're not going to be 100%. If you're not during striking, when you are 100%, you'll be a more "conditioned" striker and vice versa.

When it comes to skill level, I'm assuming you're still a white belt and while I've seen white belts beat people at higher belts, that means nothing. At while belt, all you need to focus on is surviving, not getting submitted, and not getting winded or trying to muscle your way out. It'll be more frustrating for a blue/purple/brown/black belt if they can't submit you than it would be if you muscle them off of you and don't know what to do afterwards. Also, stretch daily. I recommend 3X a day including whatever stretches your gym has you doing before workouts. Nothing serious, just 5 minute stretches here and there when you can.

Finally, watch videos. While that won't help you more than 5-10% with your BJJ game, every little bit counts. Don't rush anything either. Odds are, you'll be a white belt for a year (give or take a couple months) so focus on surviving. Finally, when it comes to Muay Thai, do what they say. Shadow box when you can at home and try to pair up with those better than you but also work with people who are new and wanna come out and throw sloppy haymakers or bumrush you from the get go. It's all handy!

TuNguyen 12-17-2012 08:53 AM

Just train more, and exercise more passion and determination.


Quote:

Originally Posted by holyburd (Post 1612434)
I am a new student at Roufusport MMA Academy. I am working Muay Thai Kickboxing and BJJ. I am only 5-6 classes in, but my bjj isn't so good to everyone elses. Obviously, some of the people have been training there for a while, but what kind of tips could you guys offer to a new guy in bjj?? Also, my trainign days usually consist of Muay Thai first for an hour, then bjj after for another hour. Would you recommend I train separate days? BJJ first because of the demanding nature? or is what I am doing just fine?


No_Mercy 12-19-2012 01:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by holyburd (Post 1612434)
I am a new student at Roufusport MMA Academy. I am working Muay Thai Kickboxing and BJJ. I am only 5-6 classes in, but my bjj isn't so good to everyone elses. Obviously, some of the people have been training there for a while, but what kind of tips could you guys offer to a new guy in bjj?? Also, my trainign days usually consist of Muay Thai first for an hour, then bjj after for another hour. Would you recommend I train separate days? BJJ first because of the demanding nature? or is what I am doing just fine?

This has nothing to do with your training as I'm thinking about placing a bet on Pettis. I need you to be a spy for me and report how his training is going. What type of drills, techniques, and game plan he's working on against Cowboy Cerrone.

You will be rewarded with credits.


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