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Standup Technique MMA Standup fighting techniques.

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Old 09-02-2007, 09:54 AM   #41 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Z-man-mma-fan
you're wrong on many points....
I admit that I pushed my personal biases in that post. But I do think that for functional strength, the big weights and the small ones (one-hand grip) are the best combination, especially if you don't have that much time. And why anyone would have a lot of time for lifting weights, I don't know.

It is interesting to hear from you that longer rest periods are advised. I will bear that in mind.
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Old 12-04-2007, 07:51 PM   #42 (permalink)
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The Uppercut

I'm copying this post from the Thread "What is the textbook uppercut?" I know I have the hook and straights on here already. Might as well keep this someplace easy to find.

A good uppercut is powered by your legs and torso. The amount of actual arm movement is minimal in comparison to a straight punch or hook. This is the reason why uppercuts are specifically used as inside weapons to come up between an opponent's standard guard (as I've defined in the stickied thread How Do You Defend Against in this post here and onward). You don't want to throw uppercuts from the outside without first setting it up with a jab and closing distance. Sure, some guys like Roy Jones Jr. have been able to shoot gazelle-like uppercuts from the outside with seemingly-indiscrete abandon of textbook methodology like he did against Montell Griffin (at the end of their second match here). Before I even start suggesting that is something that a budding fighter (or enthusiast) can entertain, you have to understand that Roy Jone Jr. possesses a level of talent and athletic ability for boxing that isn't present in 99% of the people on earth. Conventional wisdom and technique applies to everybody, so I'll just stick to that.

With the specific details of distance, stance and timing aside, let me break down the "how-to" on a textbook uppercut. I'll list the steps from the lead side (weak side) first as explaining from the rear/strong side (if you fight that way) is much the same with a few slight differences. To throw the "textbook" uppercut:
  1. Use your knees to dip your stance 6 to 8 inches. You need to use your knees and not bend at the waist. Doing so will compromise your defenses and open a lot of nasty opportunities for your opponent. It isn't a complete "hit the floor" drop of level, but a small economic movement to get under your opponent's jab, hook, etc.
  2. As you drop your level, bring your lead fist down 4 to 6 inches, while you turn your palm facing inward toward yourself. Don't think of loading up your punch in an exaggerated amount as Kin noted. Just think about dropping your elbow down and tucking it into your ribs. Anything more would be wasted movement and would open you up to a large variety of head shots.
  3. Stand up into the punch, and snap the lead side of your hip forward. This will rotate your lead shoulder into the punch.
  4. As you stand up, snap your fist upward as your shoulder turns. Your shoulder will lead before your fist.
  5. You should finish with your fist 4 to 6 inches past your opponent's chin (if you are shadow boxing or working the mitts, your fist should be aligned with your nose). Bringing your fist farther than that will invite open counters to the lead side of your head and body. Remember, this is boxing not Mortal Kombat. You want your movements short, tight and economic in case you are fighting a game opponent that will counter if they successfully defend or make you miss. Leave the 20-foot stuff to the video games.
  6. Once the punch finishes return to guard. Do this regardless of connecting or not. The worst thing a fighter can do is to "take a picture" and admire their work mid fight. If your opponent is just as determined as you, they will fire back and make everything worthless if you stop to smell the roses.
This is the regular step-by-step for the lead side uppercut. For the rear side uppercut, simply snap the rear side of your hip forward and turn your rear shoulder forward as you punch with your rear hand. If you are using the uppercut to the body, step in deeper before you throw the uppercut to the ribs or solar plexus. The beauty of the uppercut is that it can be seamlessly incorporated into a lot of standard defensive movements. Also, since the power isn't dependant on arm extension, it can be used as a devastating inside weapon after successfully evading an opponents' power shots to your head.

Again, it has to be emphasized that an uppercut's power comes from your legs and your hips. I know a lot of guys with bigger arms than me that can't throw an uppercut as with as much force for the fact that they rely on their arm strength only. Punching power comes from a co-ordinated effort of your entire body, not just your arms.

Now... to develop good uppercut power, there are a few things you can do. You can do what kishiro suggested... if you have someone around to tie you up and un-tie you. There are a few other thing that you can do that are simpler.

1) Drill the uppercut off of the duck. The duck is a defensive movement that is tailor made for uppercuts. Have your partner throw a jab or cross to get you used to ducking in and closing space. Once you are coming up from the duck, throw an uppercut. You want to really exaggerate the ducking movement to engrain it into your muscle memory. During an actual fight or sparring session, your body will learn to move just enough to make use of the duck to load your uppercut.
  • Firstly, drill just "ducking in" on your opponent off of the jab or cross. You want to be able to seamlessly duck under you opponents attack and come up on top of them right afterwards.
  • After doing that, add the uppercut to get a feel of the compelte movement and punch. This will train you to punch using your legs, not just your arms.
  • After that, duck in and end with a combination starting with the uppercut. This will teach you to return to good guard after the punch, and not "admire" your work.
Second, learn how to throw Up/Uppercut elbows like I've illustrated in this post here. Learning a good up elbow is akin to learning a good uppercut, and the body mechanics are practically the same.

Of course, I leave you with a little show and tell:
  • Learning how to throw an uppercut from the folks at Expert Cillage. As a disclaimer, I hate the fact that he emphasizes cocking your shoulder back to throw the uppercut. I think that is a completely wasted movement that can be used by good fighter to counter you. Drop that part, and I agree wholeheartedly.
  • A quick look at Mike Tyson using the uppercut in a match here. Mike used his uppercuts beautifully, and if you watch a lot of his highlights, you will notice that he completely comes up onto his toes when throwing a lot of his uppercuts.
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Old 12-21-2007, 11:14 PM   #43 (permalink)
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My initial response is on the front page, but it's older and not very deep, so I figured I'd add some stuff that I've learned since that has really helped me to develop my explosiveness and my standup skills.

Do explosiveness training. It's been said that machine based or free-weights based power training is the best thing to develop punching power, and that's the school of thought that older guys like Tank Abbott come from, but I think, personally, that that's a load of crap. Jumping pushups and explosive burpees will help your cardio and increase your strength training. On top of that, they will give you the pop that you need standing up to put guys to sleep.

Focus on stiffening up your straight punches. The jab and the cross are the two most common punches, and if you make them sting then you're pretty solid in the standup department. Even if you don't put guys to sleep, making sure that these punches land stiff can put you in a good position to follow up on opponents and get TKO's.

Work on your follow throughs for hooks and uppercuts. There is a whole ideology between the followthrough that it has to be short, but powerful. That's definitely something requisite for a knock out. While your physical power will play into it, what will also play in is how you follow through on the punch. The better your followthrough, the more damage the initial impact will do, and it's one of the examples why TKD and Karate guys don't transition so well MMA, because they work more for speed and snap than for that followthrough on their hooks and uppercuts.

Really balance your arsenal. If you've got a good knowledge of a large group of punches, you can set up the ones that you know will put your opponent to sleep with ones that you know will, at the very least, do some damage. It also helps you learn to control angles and attack from different positions that some standup guys don't know how to do.

Hope that was helpful for somebody.
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Old 12-22-2007, 06:34 AM   #44 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IronMan View Post
My initial response is on the front page, but it's older and not very deep, so I figured I'd add some stuff that I've learned since that has really helped me to develop my explosiveness and my standup skills.

Do explosiveness training. It's been said that machine based or free-weights based power training is the best thing to develop punching power, and that's the school of thought that older guys like Tank Abbott come from, but I think, personally, that that's a load of crap. Jumping pushups and explosive burpees will help your cardio and increase your strength training. On top of that, they will give you the pop that you need standing up to put guys to sleep.

Focus on stiffening up your straight punches. The jab and the cross are the two most common punches, and if you make them sting then you're pretty solid in the standup department. Even if you don't put guys to sleep, making sure that these punches land stiff can put you in a good position to follow up on opponents and get TKO's.

Work on your follow throughs for hooks and uppercuts. There is a whole ideology between the followthrough that it has to be short, but powerful. That's definitely something requisite for a knock out. While your physical power will play into it, what will also play in is how you follow through on the punch. The better your followthrough, the more damage the initial impact will do, and it's one of the examples why TKD and Karate guys don't transition so well MMA, because they work more for speed and snap than for that followthrough on their hooks and uppercuts.

Really balance your arsenal. If you've got a good knowledge of a large group of punches, you can set up the ones that you know will put your opponent to sleep with ones that you know will, at the very least, do some damage. It also helps you learn to control angles and attack from different positions that some standup guys don't know how to do.

Hope that was helpful for somebody.


this helped me thanks for the post

btw i need sum tips on workin on following thru with my punches i cant seem to do it, i got a heavy bag and im filling it up with better material so it will become tougher and harder atm i hit it and a dent appears and doesn't leave so im fillin it up more
but wen i try following thru with my punches i jus CANT do it i turn my leg hips shoulder and swing with the right hoook but the minute it hits the bag thas wen my movement stops and usualy with my straights which i think is my strongest punch it hit the bag and pull back really quickly jus as it lands iv jus naturally done this for years its quite fast but not powerful
culd this be because i have not got alot of mass or weight behind my body or punch??
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Old 02-27-2008, 01:09 AM   #45 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Onganju View Post
A little applied physics:

Force = Mass X Acceleration

The second part of the equation is usually the easier of the two to see large amounts of improvement on. That is working on hand speed. Simply punch in a way not to emphasize power, but to emphasize the amount of acceleration you put into it. If you try to "put it all" into a punch, you'll tense up. You need to punch in a fluid, loose manner. How? Repitition, repitition, repitition... Keep punching until your arms feel like they're about to fall off.

An easy thing to do, is to punch using either weights on your wrists, or using big ass 16oz training gloves. Once you take the gloves off, your hands will feel lighter, and they will move at a greater rate of acceleration.

Okay, now the first part of the equation takes a lot of fine tuning. The way that you add mass to your punch is simply by using good body mechanics to train yourself to move you body with each punch. Again, the only way to tune your body movements well enough is repitition.

For instance, when you shoot out a jab, turn your hip towards your target. That will cause your shoulders to rotate into the direction of the punch (thus adding the mass of your upper body into the equation). You can add the mass of your lower body into the equation by pushing off your rear foot and sliding your front foot forward two or three inches. This will greatly increase the amount of force in your jab.

I can probably go on in length about it, but because of time constraints let me suggest a few things:

1) Pick up a good reference book that breaks down the kinesthetics of a punch in an easily understandable manner. I suggest two books that I have right off the bat:

The Tao of Jeet Kune Do by, Bruce Lee (I know, it may be a little dated or philosophy heavy, but the way Lee breaks down the kinesiology of punching is absolutely great)
Savage Strikes by, Mark Hatmaker (A more practical and up-to-date reference and instructional book on MMA striking)

Both books are easeily found for under $20.

2) Get a heavy bag and start working rounds... And more rounds... And more rounds.

3) Find a good boxing gym. These are still fairly easy to find, and even moderate amounts of instruction can make a big difference in comparison to finding out what works for yourself. Aside from that, once you begin learning how to throw a KO punch, you're going to want to learn how to avoid getting hit by one.

Good luck.

I have an idea that worked with me! Get the pick and use it for an hour straight. Or get a sledgehammer and hit it with a tire. With me i did it without even knowing i did alot of yard work with the pick for hours in my house. Yes hit the bag hard and lots of rounds but its the technique with the combination of the sledgehammer or pick. Trust me it worked for me withouth even knowing i had to do the yard all the time! If anyone wants i can show a video of how i punch and im not a pro. Its the twisting your whole body when throwing a punch!
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Old 03-08-2008, 10:12 AM   #46 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Onganju View Post

1) You don't need extreme amounts of weight. To be completely honest, anything more than 3 pounds isn't going to help much as you're not going to be wearing more than a 4 oz glove if you actually fight. Also, you are using the extra weight to build speed and muscle endurance. Anything else will promote the growth of mass, which isn't necessarily a good thing.
Would 15 to 20 pound dumbbells be a problem then?
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Old 05-23-2009, 01:16 PM   #47 (permalink)
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a good combination of power and technique is needed to deliver a knockout punch...some believe a martial artist can develop knockout power without even touching a weight...however i believe resistance training IS neccesary to ENHANCE the power of one's punch...you can do this with a combination of olympic lifts, core srengthening and polymetric exercises such as:
power cleans,
squats,
turkish get up,
russian twist,
polymertic bounds,

just a few examples

remember though technique must take priority but resistance trainign can be used as a very powerful supplement
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Old 05-27-2009, 11:28 PM   #48 (permalink)
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Would 15 to 20 pound dumbbells be a problem then?
I've seen many boxer's do that, but mostly in short "sprint" type drills. Further, I've only seen them done with uppercuts. The problem with too much weight in the other types of punches is that you run the risk of injuring yourself by pulling muscles or stretching ligaments in your joints.

If you are simply doing shadow boxing for extended periods of time (multiple 2 or 3 minute rounds) stick with just 2 or 3lb weights. Further, you want to concentrate on form and keeping you punches short and tight. Don't put any follow through on your punches when your shadow boxing with weight.
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Old 05-29-2009, 08:32 PM   #49 (permalink)
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best bet fo u mo is to play wit rocks n stones....u should use body not mine tho..try to hit ya hardest lik hard..thnk lik he dead or he betta move cuz u a runnin train...
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Old 06-08-2009, 01:30 PM   #50 (permalink)
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Try meditation, use power from inside.
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