How Do You Defend Against? - Page 2 - MMA Forum - UFC Forums - UFC Results - MMA Videos
Standup Technique MMA Standup fighting techniques.

Reply

Old 11-10-2006, 11:12 AM   #11 (permalink)
MMA Fanatic
 
Deadly Poet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 70
Deadly Poet has a little shameless behaviour in the past
great post...

thats even the order of preference when chosing a reswponse to an attack...first choice is to intercept, not let him even finish his attack....last choice, only done in emergency should be blocking....

to ppl with more experience in striking....try to conbine interception with dodging...not just depend on intercepting the attack but get out of the way while ur intercepting...it works like a charm in combat...cause sometimes u make a mistake and cant properly intercept but if ur not there u wont get hit....to do this u need good footwork and positioning...alignment and angulation are key elements in fighting...

as my trainer told me....the best defence is accompanied (sp?) by an offence and the best offence is the one thats accompanied* by a deffence...

P.S. pardon my spelling...spanish is my first language...
Deadly Poet is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 11-10-2006, 06:12 PM   #12 (permalink)
Outta My Head
 
Onganju's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Paramount, CA
Posts: 1,220
Blog Entries: 11
Onganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level now
Thanks... Even though I haven't had the opportunity to spend time in a dojo over the last decade, I have been doing my research. During that time I've noticed that even though MMA has come light years away from when it was a Gracie JJ info-mercial, the majority of the strikers in MMA (even the good ones) don't have world class striking skills. While it wasn't any doubt that many could throw a KO strike, it became doubtful whether they could actually avoid one in an economic manner.

I honestly think that's sad to think about. If these guys can train full time to fight, you'd hope that they could cover the distance between themselves and their opponent without losing balance or leaving themselves completely open to strikes, right? On that end, defensive skills and footwork is grossly neglected in MMA, and still has room to come a ways.

Hopefully my next few posts will make as much sense. Don't be afraid to contribute.
__________________
It doesn't matter if you agree or disagree... As long as I don't bore you and I spark a moment of thought, my goal is achieved.

Queng leon queng tigre ecu tacacut, queca pa? - Pampangan Mandarigma Motto

My Blog <--READ IT!
Onganju is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 06:50 PM   #13 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
I wouldn't say that it's neglected by the really good fighters and the guys in the lower weight classes. Alot of the guys with kickboxing, thai, and boxing backrounds have really great footwork. See:
Mirko Filipovic
Shogun Rua
Anderson Silva
Chuck Liddell
Mark Hunt
Wanderlei Silva
Andrei Arlovski
Ricco Rodriguez
Pedro Rizzo
Tito Ortiz
Pretty much every lightweight and welterweight striker.

I don't think that the feet are as neglected on the pro level as much as people might think. I mean, there's only one successful fighter with flat feet I can think of, and that's Sylvia.

The age of the fat, slow, dumb heavyweight is slowly coming to an end.
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 06:59 PM   #14 (permalink)
Outta My Head
 
Onganju's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Paramount, CA
Posts: 1,220
Blog Entries: 11
Onganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level now
As far as that list goes, those guys are definitely the exception to the rule. I do agree that the lighter weight guys tend to have a better technical grasp on Strike Defense and Footwork. I think that is more due to the fact that until the recent weight classes, these guys had to train to be able to face larger (sometimes much larger) opponents. Yves Edwards vs Mark Hominick is a great example of this.
__________________
It doesn't matter if you agree or disagree... As long as I don't bore you and I spark a moment of thought, my goal is achieved.

Queng leon queng tigre ecu tacacut, queca pa? - Pampangan Mandarigma Motto

My Blog <--READ IT!
Onganju is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 07:12 PM   #15 (permalink)
MMA Fanatic
 
Deadly Poet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 70
Deadly Poet has a little shameless behaviour in the past
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronMan
I wouldn't say that it's neglected by the really good fighters and the guys in the lower weight classes. Alot of the guys with kickboxing, thai, and boxing backrounds have really great footwork. See:
Mirko Filipovic
Shogun Rua
Anderson Silva
Chuck Liddell
Mark Hunt
Wanderlei Silva
Andrei Arlovski
Ricco Rodriguez
Pedro Rizzo
Tito Ortiz
Pretty much every lightweight and welterweight striker.

I don't think that the feet are as neglected on the pro level as much as people might think. I mean, there's only one successful fighter with flat feet I can think of, and that's Sylvia.

The age of the fat, slow, dumb heavyweight is slowly coming to an end.
they are getting better but its not near what it can be...and a lot of the guys on ur list are not tech strikers but more strong strikers...their tech can get way better....

Anderson Silva
BJ Penn
Cro Cop

those are my top 3 tech strikers (in no order)....oh and u can add Chuck...

U could say Shogun is a great striker, he is, but his footwork tends to get sloppy....and Wandy, as great as he is, is not a technical striker....

the good thing is that striking is getting better and guys who specialize in striking are showing better skill....still MMA striking needs to improve....
Deadly Poet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 07:58 PM   #16 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
I wasn't really referring to tech on the feet. I definitely wouldn't have had all of those guys if that was all I was talking about. I was referring to footwork in general. There are alot of wrestlers who have really good footwork, which is why I listed Tito and Ricco, even though there are alot more.

Standup isn't just about the strikes in MMA, you also have to be conscious of everything else that can happen. Takedows, sprawls and clinches are just as important as the other stuff.
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 08:42 PM   #17 (permalink)
Outta My Head
 
Onganju's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Paramount, CA
Posts: 1,220
Blog Entries: 11
Onganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level now
Quote:
Standup isn't just about the strikes in MMA, you also have to be conscious of everything else that can happen. Takedows, sprawls and clinches are just as important as the other stuff.
True... That's the reason why I'm going to post defensive techniques with that in mind.

Quote:
Wandy, as great as he is, is not a technical striker....
I agree. It's the reason why he ends up getting rocked whenever he's in there with a confident striker(not that it means he loses). It happened with Belfort, Mezger, Sakuraba during their second match, Henderson, Jackson in their first match, Hunt, and I don't need to mention what happened against Cro Cop.
__________________
It doesn't matter if you agree or disagree... As long as I don't bore you and I spark a moment of thought, my goal is achieved.

Queng leon queng tigre ecu tacacut, queca pa? - Pampangan Mandarigma Motto

My Blog <--READ IT!
Onganju is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 10:37 PM   #18 (permalink)
Hammer Fist Elbow
 
Matt_Serra_Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 350
Matt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enoughMatt_Serra_Fan will become famous soon enough
I'm only a wrestler but i'll give it a shot from my knowledge

a)an elbow strike?

Basically if your getting elbow strikes to you head the only thing to do is
keep your hands up, try to squeeze out, or fire back.

b)a knee kick?

Painful. I say take a few and dish out a few. Once you have learned your foe's movements and patterns try to trace that the next time he does it and counter with punches, a takedown, or a kick of your own.

c)the ever popular punch or knee to the ribs?

All I gotta say is never put your hands down to defend your body because you will feel something hit your face and a couple seconds later youll be on the mat wondering what happened. The only counter to these IMO is to defend by using your legs to put over your ribs to block the punch with your leg.

d)a hook to the head, like a left hook or a right hook to the head?

Hands up. Wait for an opening and fire back.

e)a spinning back kick to the head?

Ouch. This one is a toughy because its so sudden but I say keep your distance and if it is unavoidable block with your hand/forearm or leg.

I hope my post helped and if not feel free to flame
__________________
Matt "The Terra" Serra

R.I.P Evan Tanner
Matt_Serra_Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2006, 10:54 PM   #19 (permalink)
Outta My Head
 
Onganju's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Paramount, CA
Posts: 1,220
Blog Entries: 11
Onganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level now
Boxing as a tool to Teach Striking Defense

Boxing as a striking art is very popular in MMA not just for its offensive acumen, but also for defense as the defensive movements and techniques are easy to learn, and easy to apply in MMA. As such, the standard boxing defense (with a few adjustments) can be very effective.

The reason why I am going into this first over the other types of defense is that this is the easiest to learn, and takes the shortest amount of time to engrain into your reflexes. The great thing about the straight boxing defense is that is not only applicable against punches, but it works well against kicking attacks from the waist up. Before I get into the specific techniques themselves, let me go over some basic Theorem.

Learning Defense: The TMA Method
Defense as it is taught within the general TMA styles can be described as routinely drilling your specific blocking techniques as designed for specific attacks. Once one drills the technique against the air, it is then moved over into “application” within 1 or 2-step forms or katas of defense. Within many TMA styles the terms of “Upper Outside Block,” “Lower Outside Sweep,” “X-block,” or other similar techniques are taught and trained to be implemented as one recognizes the type of attack that technique is designed for. Essentially the multitude of TMA went through the same route training as Ralph Machio in “The Karate Kid” without actually painting the floor or throwing back shots of Sake with Arnold from “Happy Days.”

The grand flaw in the practice of Defense within TMA styles is that when faced with an opponent in real life, it became obvious that actual live, resisting, and aggressive opponents did not have the tendency to attack with the same compliance or roboticism as their training partners in the Dojo. Rather, they were soon introduced to the painful reality that when one decides to swing, they usually don’t just swing once, and that fights tend to continue on even if the initial set of techniques are actually successful. On that end, many TMA practitioners found themselves “painting the floor” with their own faces.

Going beyond that, if one took the time to step away from the katas and examine the actual practice of styles during “freestyle” sparring, it became obvious that the standard prescribed techniques fell to the wayside in favor of movement and aggression. Those who rigidly followed the basics of the Dojo only found success when seemingly discarding years of technical defensive training. Obviously, something was amiss.

Learning Defense: Modern Boxing Method
On the other side of the coin, modern boxing practitioners forged further with making “the sweet science” actually more scientific. Although a combat sport far removed from MMA, it is put into practice on a regular basis by many MMA competitors. Why? Well, there are a few reasons:

1) Boxing is taught and practiced under “live” sparring conditions. Sure there are drills that will be run, but all the true learning is done during sparring when one figures out what works. In this end, the practitioner is placed deeply in the chaos that is combat and is placed in that situation until it comes to an end. Nothing was routine or robotic.
2) The defensive blocking/cover techniques were simple and intuitive. When training to learn a boxing defense, one is taught simple covers and is trained to defend the angle of attack not specific techniques. On that end, one can assure that they know how to defend themselves even when the levels of stress and fatigue increase. With the TMA method once the level of stress and fatigue goes beyond the normal threshold of the practitioner, fine distinction between one technique to another becomes highly difficult (close to impossible) causing the practitioner to either be too late in choosing a defensive technique, or intuitively choose the wrong technique altogether. Suffice it to say, that doesn’t work out well if a fight goes past the initial set of techniques.
3) Boxers are taught to incorporate upper body mobility and footwork to ensure that they don’t get hit. Where the TMA method relies solely on the power of the blocking technique to meet force with force, the modern boxer is taught to cover and move out of the way of the incoming attack. In the rigidity of forms that are engrained into the mind and habits of the TMA practitioner, they find themselves offering too many openings to an opponent even if they successfully block the incoming attack.

On those points above, when trained properly on how to box the MMA practitioner becomes a more mobile and slippery opponent. It does not do any MMA practitioner well to “take one” in hopes to land their own. Why? Because it only takes one shot that is either hard enough or placed in the right spot to turn a fight around. Personally speaking, I read the above posts soliciting the idea of taking a shot to the body in order to land one to the head and I couldn’t help but shake my head in disgust. If you are fighting against someone who likes throwing body shots (like Rutten, Hominick, Hoost, etc) or you get hit in the liver or solar plexus, you find out very well that such a mindset is hindrance to actually becoming a better fighter.

In my next post I'll go over the actual boxing covers, and how they apply in MMA.

Sources:
Wikipedia
Savage Strikes by, Mark Hatmaker
__________________
It doesn't matter if you agree or disagree... As long as I don't bore you and I spark a moment of thought, my goal is achieved.

Queng leon queng tigre ecu tacacut, queca pa? - Pampangan Mandarigma Motto

My Blog <--READ IT!
Onganju is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2006, 12:29 AM   #20 (permalink)
Outta My Head
 
Onganju's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Paramount, CA
Posts: 1,220
Blog Entries: 11
Onganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level nowOnganju is on another level now
Boxing D: 101a – Stance and Movement

Okay… Now we move on to the actual meat and potatoes of Boxing Defense. This is a very basic and skeletal break down. However, I believe this since this is so basic it is also the easiest to learn and apply. Let’s take a moment to address Stance and Upper Body Movement.

Stance:
Your basic MMA fighting stance is a hybrid stance of Western Boxing and Greco-Roman Wrestling. Not only must the MMA competitor be wary of strikes, but they must also be aware of takedowns and being clinched. So let me lay out your standard MMA fighting stance or “en garde” position, as all the following techniques will assume you are in this position. We will assume an orthodox position for simplicity's sake, but the standard conventions behind the upcoming list of techniques can (and should) be drilled and utilized in a southpaw position.

Let’s say that you are standing on a clock face with your body facing noon, your left foot would be at 10 o’clock and your right foot would be at 4 o’clock. Your knees would be bent, with your weight evenly distributed on both legs. Your body should be in a position between being completely upright and crouching. Both hands would be up at face level, with your right hand up by your right cheek and your right elbow resting on your ribcage. Your left hand will be up in front of your left shoulder about 12 inches away, with your left elbow resting on the left side of your ribcage. Your chin would be tucked down toward your chest while your lead shoulder is brought up to help keep it protected. Resist the urge to flare out your elbows in an inverted “V” as that opens up your body. That in a nutshell is your basic MMA fighting stance; the “en garde” position.

The stance prescribed above is a modified boxer’s stance. Taking in account that the MMA practitioner is not only going to be wary of strikes from a standing position, but must also be ready to shoot, or sprawl, the stance prescribed above provides a solid base while still allowing ease of mobility. In this stance one can still strike and defend, while still being able to shoot or sprawl if they are shot on. Further, the squared stance lends more rotation of the body when firing strikes off from both the lead and rear limbs, allowing the practitioner the ability to commit more mass to each attack. On this end, even your jabs can be of consequence to your opponent.

Upper Body Movement:
The Upper Body Movements of boxing that are utilized (or advocated for use) in MMA are the Pull/Lean, Slip and Duck. The “Bob and Weave” isn’t advocated. While it is very effective in boxing matches, the danger of knees, kicks, downward strikes, or having the back of your head grabbed and “snapped down” is too prevalent to prescribe the use of that technique. In boxing, the only danger you have in that position is an uppercut.

Pull/Lean – With this you lean away from an incoming strike, in an economic and ballistic manner. You do not want to lean too far back, as it loads too much of your weight solely on your rear leg, making leg kicks and takedowns extremely dangerous. If an attack is so deep you cannot avoid it by leaning back a few inches, you are better served to cover up and step away while defending. All leans are ballistic in manner while leaning back, and while returning back to position (ideally with an attack of your own). Leans that are “lazy” where the fighter loses their guard position, or are slow to return will leave the fighter off balance and open to continued attack.

Slip – The Slip can be described as leaning laterally away from an attack. While that is true in a basic sense, there is actually a bit more technique involved that makes the movement a sound application in fights. The Slip is actually by bending at the knees to drop levels, and turning your body in the direction you are “slipping” to. So if you are slipping left, you would lower your level while bending at the knees, and turn you’re your right shoulder toward your left knee. If you are slipping right, you would be turning your left shoulder toward your right knee. Slips are done with minimal bending of the waist, as it opens you up to too many attacks in a MMA scenario (see the Bob and Weave above). By keeping the torso movement economical, and using the legs to lower your level, you are able to evade in a manner that doesn’t upset your base.

Duck – The Duck is accomplished almost solely by your legs. When performed properly, the Duck is a great evasive maneuver that can be implemented to place you directly on your opponent to counter attack with strikes or grappling options. Mark Hatmaker describes the use of the duck in this manner: Imagine that there is a large capital “V” in between you and your opponent, where the end up each top stroke of the V is at each of your heads. When you recognize your opponent throwing an attack at your head, bend your knees and drop level and approach like you are on the downward stroke of your side of the V. Once you reach the bottom and your opponent’s attack bites the air, stand up into the opponent as you ascend their side of the V. This should put you right on top of them in range to follow up with strikes. Alternatively, you can shoot if you are deep enough when you hit the bottom stroke of the V. When ducking, you have to make a habit of keeping your arms in tight and not to bend forward at the waist (again, see the Bob and Weave above).

Boxing D: 101b - Blocking and Covering will follow soon.

Sources:
Bas Rutten's Big Book of Combat by, Bas Rutten
Savage Strikes by, Mark Hatmaker
__________________
It doesn't matter if you agree or disagree... As long as I don't bore you and I spark a moment of thought, my goal is achieved.

Queng leon queng tigre ecu tacacut, queca pa? - Pampangan Mandarigma Motto

My Blog <--READ IT!
Onganju is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums
Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
Powered by vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2009 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios