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post #31 of 40 (permalink) Old 03-26-2009, 08:59 PM
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unless you close your eyes with you hands behind your head he'll regret it or rethink challenging you in the future.
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post #32 of 40 (permalink) Old 03-27-2009, 12:35 AM
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A good fighter will not dismiss the value of TKD. TKD can be a great addition to a fighters arsenal, and it's great for balance and striking techniques. Of course, TKD on it's own will fail in MMA, but mix it with some boxing and JJ and you are good to go. The point of MMA is to not limit yourself to one style.

I also think TKD gets a bad rap because it is has always been a commonly tought martial art, so you will always have ALOT of shitty fighters. But yeah, TKD can be a good addition to your skills if you take it seriously. I'm currently training in both TKD & BJJ.

But yeah, combine your boxing background with JJ and you should be able to take this guy out.
I've said many times that I train boxing along with TKD, as my teacher is very skilled in both disciplines. I do NOT drop my hands. (Much). Also not every TKD school places that much value on the flashy kicks. That is more for competition schools who want to impress judges. We do go to competitions but it's more for fun than anything else. We're more concerned about which kicks are more effective, and I can assure you that we frequently hit with our shins.

Any art that is widely practiced is going to have its share of bullsh!t schools and people who are a high rank who can't do anything noteworthy. I've also been told that TKD is a good foundation for someone wanting to start MT. That's me, but MT is not available in my area.

I get a little discouraged by the blanket statements about any martial art, tbh.


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post #33 of 40 (permalink) Old 04-06-2009, 05:39 PM
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TKD is actually highly effective in MMA if used correctly and kept in perspective. One of the biggest issues with TKD in MMA is not the focus on kicks, but rather the deep stances used to drive the power generated in our flashy kicks. TKD practicioners are tyically easy to take down because of these stances. This means either the TKD fighter throws a kick and gets taken down or doesn't throw kicks because he is afraid of getting taken down.

TKD, like many other martial arts disciplines, uses the round kick as the mainstay kick of the art. We tell people that regardless of their belt, they will always be evolving their round kick. TKD also uses front kicks which have proven very useful to maintain and gauge distance provided the person is using the right tool for the job. I typically disagree with any spinning technique used in MMA with the exception of the spinning backfist and spinning side-kick.

When I transitioned into MMA I took a lot of lumps from Muay Thai strikers, but I gave just as many right back. I was also taken down fairly easily. I adjusted my techniques. The 45 degree chambering in TKD can be very misleading if you know how to use it. I've rocked a lot of folks and put down quite a few as well by setting them up with fun kicking shenanigans from TKD. I can do this with a solid sprawl if I want to keep the fight standing up due to stance adjustments.

MMA is greater than the sum of the parts. Use TKD/kickboxing when the situation calls for it, switch to something that suits you better for clinch fighting, and adapt again when you go to the ground.


**EDIT**
To answer the question of the OP, the outcome is more dependent on the competitors than specific styles involved. You guys probably haven't negotiated the 'rules' of your competition. If it is a point system competition in a stand-up bout, he's probably got the edge stylistically. If it is MMA rules and he is exclusively familiar with TKD you should have the edge with five months of more rounded training.
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post #34 of 40 (permalink) Old 04-06-2009, 09:14 PM
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agree with the posts above, tkd is majorly underrated as a martial art because its so popular, so naturally a lot of shitty fighters are going to be in it

been training tkd for 7 years, bjj for 3, boxing for 4, and just picked up wrestling about a year ago..and can safely say i stand pretty well with most of the MT fighters around here, our kicks definitely set most of them way off timing, and poking in that side kick/turning side is definitely effective from time to time, and the step behind sidekick closes distance on the opponent, real fast.

that said, i've picked up MT recently to get better with my clinch work

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post #35 of 40 (permalink) Old 04-06-2009, 11:34 PM
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Hey guys what up? I have a friend who has been training TKD for about 8 months now. He keeps on nagging me for a sparring session and stuff and I keep on declining because he might kick my ass. I have been involved in boxing before for about 2 years and going to start training a Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai combination.

How would my JJ and MT stack up to his TKD??? I am planning to take him on in 5 months time. Any tips???

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As a veteran of a few fights with TKD guys, I can tell you that fighting a TKD guy on the ground is like being a kid in a candy store for me. Rarely do I see so many bad habits and a complete lack of understanding of grappling.

However, a solid TKD guy generally has good kicks. If you're friends only been training for eight months, then he's not going to be that good, but a TKD blackbelt can do some serious damage with some kicks, especially the roundhouse and spinning back kick (which I will never underestimate, having seen a guy end up in the hospital with a punctured lung after taking on in the ribs).

If you've got decent thai skills, then it'll be fun. His kicks will be faster, just pay attention and throw the leg kicks and use the clinch.

If you're really worried, put him on his back. I'm assuming that since you typed "jiu-jitsu" instead of "jujitsu" that it's Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. In that case, it shouldn't be too tough to pass the guard and work submissions.



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post #36 of 40 (permalink) Old 04-07-2009, 07:14 PM
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*Edit: My bad, Andy Hug trained Kyokushin Karate (I did for a couple months as well) not TKD.

People that don't understand fighting hype TKD too much because of what McDojos have made it out to be. With the right instructor, in the right school, you can integrate TKD with Boxing and maybe even Muay Thai and it can become deadly.

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post #37 of 40 (permalink) Old 04-07-2009, 09:22 PM
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*Edit: My bad, Andy Hug trained Kyokushin Karate (I did for a couple months as well) not TKD.

People that don't understand fighting hype TKD too much because of what McDojos have made it out to be. With the right instructor, in the right school, you can integrate TKD with Boxing and maybe even Muay Thai and it can become deadly.
Yes, precisely! that's why I always make a point of saying that my TKD teacher has an extensive boxing background and trains us in boxing as well. He integrates the two disciplines very well and as I've said before, my school is by no means a typical TKD school and definitely not a McDojo, our belt tests are 4 or 5 hours long due to all we're supposed to have remembered, plus sparring and breaking.


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post #38 of 40 (permalink) Old 07-05-2009, 12:54 AM
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From by experience TKD kicks are no where near as effective as MT kicks. The reason being is that TKD kicks land with the foot or with the Heel while MT kicks land wiht the shin.
The difference is this... TKD kicks are like getting hit in a precise spot with a ball peen hammer, while MT is like getting hit with a baseball bat. Both hurt and have their uses. I'm telling you, if TKD schools got rid of their time spent on katas/forms (not that there is anything wrong with that) and replaced that time with the kind of conditioning that MT uses, TKD would be just as useful in MMA. That's why I train TKD along with kickboxing for more practicality. A TKD fighter who actually conditions himself well outside of what is tought in the traditional class setting can put a hurting on a MT guy, but you rarely find TKD people who train that seriously cuz it's usually more for sport or to teach kids discipline.
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post #39 of 40 (permalink) Old 07-05-2009, 01:00 AM
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I get a little discouraged by the blanket statements about any martial art, tbh.
Right on
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post #40 of 40 (permalink) Old 07-05-2009, 01:16 AM
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I've said many times that I train boxing along with TKD, as my teacher is very skilled in both disciplines. I do NOT drop my hands.
That's another good point. It's easy to point out how alot of TKD fighters do not keep their hands up, but when you take the practical parts of TKD & mix it with other arts (hence MMA) it's a whole new ball game. Naturally, like you said, having some experience in boxing should help with keeping the hands up. And good conditioning will beef up the TKD kicks that are actually useful in the cage, like the side kicks, head kicks, and the mean ass rear horse kicks. Bring the meat & potatoes and leave the flashy Tornado kicks for show & TKD sport tournaments. Of course, that was pretty sweet when David Loiseau’s spinning back kick to the body left Charles McCarthy unable to continue in UFC 53. Heres a list I found of the top 10 MMA kicks, all of which btw are tought in TKD.
http://martialarts.about.com/od/mmaa...opmmakicks.htm
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