Boxing Styles: Swarmer, Boxer, Slugger, or Boxer-Puncher? - Page 2 - MMA Forum - UFC Forums - UFC Results - MMA Videos
Standup Technique MMA Standup fighting techniques.

Reply

Old 11-08-2006, 05:57 PM   #11 (permalink)
1 2 3 Blast Off!
 
TheSuplexor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,972
TheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A Hug
Quote:
Originally Posted by hurrakane212
Define "rotational exercises" please.
If you want strong punches, you need strong legs. The best way to strengthen legs is through squats. Of course I do not mean to imply exclusivity and of course other exercises are to be encouraged. However, the squat is called the "king of exercises" for a reason. Working the major muscles in the legs also releases natural gowth hormones for better overall size/strength gains.
Sure, there is a lot of rotation in lotsa punches, but ALL good punches utilize the legs.~Nathan
Bodybuilding.com - Muscle Media - Full Contact Abs With Pavel Tsatsouline.
this is a rotational exercise, of course you need leg work as well. but that move mimics a punch motion. a lot of muscles are involved in punches....
__________________
Mac Danzig and his bird feeder once visited the Virgin Islands. They are now The Islands.
Mac Danzig can kill two fighters with one bird feeder.
Superman owns a pair of Mac Danzig bird feeder pajamas.
TheSuplexor is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 11-08-2006, 09:48 PM   #12 (permalink)
MMA Fanatic
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Cleveland, TN
Posts: 30
hurrakane212 has a little shameless behaviour in the past
yep

That's a fun exercise by the way. It seems we aren't actually disagreeing, just emphasizing different exercises.~Nathan
hurrakane212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 10:26 PM   #13 (permalink)
1 2 3 Blast Off!
 
TheSuplexor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,972
TheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A Hug
Quote:
Originally Posted by hurrakane212
That's a fun exercise by the way. It seems we aren't actually disagreeing, just emphasizing different exercises.~Nathan
yeah, well that exercise has been working excellently for me, i didn't have much hip/oblique power at first, but now i am a beast lol
__________________
Mac Danzig and his bird feeder once visited the Virgin Islands. They are now The Islands.
Mac Danzig can kill two fighters with one bird feeder.
Superman owns a pair of Mac Danzig bird feeder pajamas.
TheSuplexor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 01:25 PM   #14 (permalink)
MMA Fanatic
 
Deadly Poet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 70
Deadly Poet has a little shameless behaviour in the past
Quote:
Originally Posted by hurrakane212
Define "rotational exercises" please.
If you want strong punches, you need strong legs. The best way to strengthen legs is through squats. Of course I do not mean to imply exclusivity and of course other exercises are to be encouraged. However, the squat is called the "king of exercises" for a reason. Working the major muscles in the legs also releases natural gowth hormones for better overall size/strength gains.
Sure, there is a lot of rotation in lotsa punches, but ALL good punches utilize the legs.~Nathan
yes all good punchers utilize the legs but the main source of power is the hips...u can have huge strong legs but if ur hip flexors are not developed then ur power wont be as strong....
this article might help...

Turbo-Charge your Striking Power

Steve Cotter, RKC Sr
In order to generate force in the body and transfer that force into an effective strike, there has to be an understanding of the essential mechanics involved. In the myriad of martial art systems, be it karate, kung fu, boxing, or ju jitsu, the student is first taught how to stand. The particular stance of the system sets the foundation for developing effective strikes. With the study of stance/footwork, the student learns how to generate force from the ground up. The legs coil and uncoil, lunging and evading, all the while storing and unleashing elastic energy. So from the beginning all students learn that


The legs are integral to the development of striking power.

As force is increased through the foot's contact with the ground, it moves up the leg as a wave and joins with the force generated through the rotation of the hips. This rotation allow for greater extension and projection of the accumulated force. Simultaneously the abdominal 'core' is contracted and pressurized so that the force has a stable 'platform' to project forward from as the fist (or palm, foot, etc) impacts its target. Some martial art systems teach use of the kiai at this point, to increase the pressurization in the abdominal cavity. Keep in mind that the hip joint is complex and involves a large mass of musculature. Some martial art systems emphasize training the muscles of the inner hip (piriformis, iliopsoas, etc.--baguazhang is famous for this) rather than simply the large muscles of the outer hip, such as the gluteals.


The hips are integral to the development of striking power.

"Now", you say, "I got it". But wait, there's still one key mechanical component to add, if you want to maximize your punching power. The expansion and contraction of the muscles of the thorax will generate incredible power when applied to a strike. The reason is because we are talking about very strong muscles, the muscles that are involved with respiration such as the intercostales and subcostales, and the diaphragm. The latissimus dorsi (lats) also act as an accessory muscle in respiration. As the legs are propelling the force forward and the hips are rotating and extending the force, the torso will be forcefully contracted as the strike impacts its target. One should note a strong compression in the abdominal region and the ribcage.


The muscles of the thorax are integral to the development of striking power.

The exercise that I have found to be very useful for teaching the body how to properly contract the thorax is the Russian Military Press. If you are not thoroughly familiar with this exercise, review the RKC video and book and practice the RMP with kettlebells! With some practice, you will get a very clear sense of fully expanding and fully contracting the muscles of the ribcage.

Once you have developed the full range of motion with the RMP, put down the KB and practice the same movement with just your body. You should still be able to create the proper tension throughout the body. With the hand that is not pressing, place your fingers over the side of your ribs on the working side. As you press the hand overhead, you should feel the ribs on the pressing side open fully, so that you can poke your fingertips between the ribs. As you pull the hand down, feel the ribs closing around your fingers, so that at the bottom of the compression, your ribs form one solid 'vest', and your fingers cannot penetrate between the ribs. It is very important that you fully compress at the bottom of the movement. Think of corkscrewing the elbow down into the body as you pull the arm down. Feel a solid linkage from the armpit all the way down to the hip, so that the lats and obliques feel like one continuous muscle.

Over time, you will learn to easily expand and contract the muscles of the thorax and will be able to do so with less and less movement of the arm. Progress to the point that you can solicit the full expansion and contraction of the ribs without having to move the arms at all. Once you are at this stage in your practice, you will be able to transfer this muscle control skill into your strikes.

The legs, hips and torso and involved in all types of strikes, be it straight punches, uppercuts, hammer fist, elbows, knees, or kicks, as well as in grappling and throwing.


To incorporate full body power into a strike, there must be power generation from the legs, hips, and torso.

There is more, of course, to generating powerful strikes than the basic mechanics discussed above. Other key components include technique, timing, and balance, as well as strengthening weak links in the body such as the wrist for punching and the foot/ankle for kicking. However, by learning how to properly integrate the strength of the torso with that of the legs and hips, you are enhancing your ability to maximize your striking power.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Steve Cotter is a senior RKC instructor and a national full contact kung fu champion. He is based in San Diego and offers individual instruction and seminars. Contact Steve at kettlebells@cox.net.
Deadly Poet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 02:52 PM   #15 (permalink)
MMA Fanatic
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Cleveland, TN
Posts: 30
hurrakane212 has a little shameless behaviour in the past
nice article

Once again, I am in no way denying that power comes Through (not from... assuredly not from ) the hips. If you were floating in a zero gravity environment, it would be very difficult to throw a punch with any power because you have nothing to push against. The power starts in the legs as you push against the ground, only then can the rotation of the hips/torso be utilized in order to smash that hook into the opponent. So remember, power goes through the hips, not comes from them. Common misconception.
And yes, rotational exercises are important, very much so. But many people underestimate the value of strong legs. Punching isn't all legs, or hips, or arm, it's a power chain of sequential movements. Catch "Fight Science" on the discovery chanel for a good (albeit sensational) demonstration of how power is generated and transferred.
~Nathan
hurrakane212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 03:48 PM   #16 (permalink)
1 2 3 Blast Off!
 
TheSuplexor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,972
TheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A HugTheSuplexor Needs A Hug
what's a Russian Military Press???
and yes you need the legs, i think the exercise i posted would be way more beneficial in throwing a punch then squats because the landmine mimics the punching motion (besides the snap of the arm at the end) squats don't have any rotation in them so they don't build up the necassary punching muscles as well.
__________________
Mac Danzig and his bird feeder once visited the Virgin Islands. They are now The Islands.
Mac Danzig can kill two fighters with one bird feeder.
Superman owns a pair of Mac Danzig bird feeder pajamas.
TheSuplexor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2006, 05:15 PM   #17 (permalink)
MMA Fanatic
 
Deadly Poet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 70
Deadly Poet has a little shameless behaviour in the past
Quote:
Originally Posted by hurrakane212
Once again, I am in no way denying that power comes Through (not from... assuredly not from ) the hips. If you were floating in a zero gravity environment, it would be very difficult to throw a punch with any power because you have nothing to push against. The power starts in the legs as you push against the ground, only then can the rotation of the hips/torso be utilized in order to smash that hook into the opponent. So remember, power goes through the hips, not comes from them. Common misconception.
And yes, rotational exercises are important, very much so. But many people underestimate the value of strong legs. Punching isn't all legs, or hips, or arm, it's a power chain of sequential movements. Catch "Fight Science" on the discovery chanel for a good (albeit sensational) demonstration of how power is generated and transferred.
~Nathan
of course the legs are important...as a matter of fact in the article that I posted legs are the first thing to be mentioned....the power comes from the ground and travels up so strong legs are very important....squats or pistols are very good for developing leg strength also deadlifts are great...
I do jumping squats (body weight), deadlifts, and pistols to strengthen the legs...but also do rotational exercises to develop the hips...and those type of exercises will also get ur legs stronger....

so both exercises are very important....like my trainer says if u want to judge a fighter look at his footwork first....if he has good footwork then look for the rest...I didnt meant to say squats where not important...I meant to say that it needs to be a compliment of legs and hips and the up the rest of the body...like u said in better words...a power chain of sequential movements.

Last edited by Deadly Poet : 11-10-2006 at 05:19 PM.
Deadly Poet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2006, 02:34 AM   #18 (permalink)
MMA Fanatic
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Cleveland, TN
Posts: 30
hurrakane212 has a little shameless behaviour in the past
yep

gotta have the total package. MMA is surely a total body endeavour. It is important to be in top condition in order to really succede. Power, speed, footwork, acuracy, strategy, etc... and people think were a bunch of big dumb brutes slugging away at eachother.... ~Nathan
hurrakane212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2006, 01:33 PM   #19 (permalink)
Flyweight
 
Hughesfan2791's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: England
Posts: 385
Hughesfan2791 is an unknown quantity at this pointHughesfan2791 is an unknown quantity at this point
I'd say im a boxer, quickness with a good punch, can duck and dodge so i dont get hit. Punch and back off. Quiet techniqual.
Hughesfan2791 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2006, 07:21 PM   #20 (permalink)
Flyweight
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 400
Randy GNP has a little shameless behaviour in the past
I just saw an interesting article in my latest edition of Ultimate Grappler. It talks about how to do wieghted punches without hurting yourself. What you want to do is hold light wieghts in your standard fighting stance (start with as low as 5 or 10 pounds). Rather than punch straight forward you rotate your hips and punch with the opposite hand (ie. rotate to the right and punch with right hand. It is important to use proper technique while doing this. Turn the palm to the ground at the last moment and extend your arm and then your shoulder.

This works out the full range of motion. Hip rotation, arms, chest, and even a little bit of legs. I'm not saying this is the only exercise you should do put it can be a nice polisher to strong and fast punches.

By the way I find that it helps to visualize an opponent in front of me and imagine where my punch is landing. Mental preparation is as essential as physical preparation.
Randy GNP is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums
Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
Powered by vBulletin Copyright 2000-2009 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios