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-   -   Off-hand training (http://www.mmaforum.com/standup-technique/559-off-hand-training.html)

The Don 06-24-2006 05:55 PM

Off-hand training
 
OK I am a right handed fighter. I got good power and speed with my right hand and a quick left jab. I am also decent with low kicks. I feel comfortable in a south paw stance. my right jab has alot of unexpected power since I am a right and I have a good side kick from that stance and feel very comfortable grappling from all positions.

Question is now.. How can someone in my situation improve there abalities from the off side. I know things like if you practice 100 punches with your right hand do double with the off hand.. but there has to be other ways? So what are they?:dunno:

IronMan 06-25-2006 01:54 PM

I think if you're working with off hand speed you should jut hit the speed bag for a bunch of reps with your off hand. That left jab is really great for openning up combos.

The Don 06-25-2006 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronMan
I think if you're working with off hand speed you should jut hit the speed bag for a bunch of reps with your off hand. That left jab is really great for openning up combos.

Speed is really the only problem I do not have I got a pretty quick left jab.. so what else can be done...

Onganju 06-26-2006 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Don
Speed is really the only problem I do not have I got a pretty quick left jab.. so what else can be done...

Repitition is definitely key. If you want a good reference guide for MMA Striking, I would find Mark Hatmaker's "Savage Strikes." It is a good introductory guide for striking in MMA. It breaks down the Kinesthetics of punching pretty well, and it addressed elbow, knees and kicks too. This should be a good start, as you noted you're primarily a grappler. If you were an advanced striker, I wouldn't recommend it as readily. But at $10, there isn't too much to lose.

The reason why I noted getting a reference book first, is that you can get a an idea of the finer movements that have to go into the punch. From there, if you don't have anyone with boxing knowledge/experience, you can train technique with a better idea of what to correct. The first requirement for power in strikes is speed/acceleration. The second would be mass.

Remember: Force = Mass * Acceleration. If your able to get your arms moving at a decent speed, then you have to train the rest of your body to move along with it to lend mass to your punches. I could go on in length on it, but I think you get the point.

The Don 06-27-2006 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Onganju
Repitition is definitely key. If you want a good reference guide for MMA Striking, I would find Mark Hatmaker's "Savage Strikes." It is a good introductory guide for striking in MMA. It breaks down the Kinesthetics of punching pretty well, and it addressed elbow, knees and kicks too. This should be a good start, as you noted you're primarily a grappler. If you were an advanced striker, I wouldn't recommend it as readily. But at $10, there isn't too much to lose.

The reason why I noted getting a reference book first, is that you can get a an idea of the finer movements that have to go into the punch. From there, if you don't have anyone with boxing knowledge/experience, you can train technique with a better idea of what to correct. The first requirement for power in strikes is speed/acceleration. The second would be mass.

Remember: Force = Mass * Acceleration. If your able to get your arms moving at a decent speed, then you have to train the rest of your body to move along with it to lend mass to your punches. I could go on in length on it, but I think you get the point.

I'll certinaly look into and I have plenty of Mass. 6'2" 250. not your typical grappler. and while I can throw decent punches and my form is not bad. Most of the MA I studied were striking forms I just had teachers that taught both and I excelled and felt more comfortable grappling, I think that might be it.. Comfort level I can throw a good punch but I just do not feel comfortable standing up and striking.. and yea my technique does need some work.. maybe alot.. espically with my off side. Thanks.

Onganju 06-27-2006 10:16 PM

The other point of training the off hand is simply to be familiar enough to defend yourself if you find yourself in a position where your primary hand is not readily available for fighting. Whether it be injury, restrictive space, etc, then you're not completely helpless.

Myself, when I'm at the shooting range I always empty a clip or two with my left hand. At different times playing pool, I'll shoot with my left. It's always kind of fun to catch guys with a stiff jab or hook when sparring. They usually don't expect it.

I guess the other thing to keep in mind is that training the off-hand for offense is that it increases your defensive capabilities.

IronMan 06-30-2006 05:21 PM

Yeah, the off hand is worth training.

The Don 07-01-2006 11:08 AM

ok so any more advice on training off hand or is it simply a matter of just using it more???

Onganju 07-05-2006 07:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Don
ok so any more advice on training off hand or is it simply a matter of just using it more???

I think the biggest obstacle is coming to a point where you need to train while being conscious of the fact that you have to utilize it more. This is where havign a training partner becomes real effective. While being able to just drill repetition on a heavy bag will go a long way, if you have skilled partner with a set of focus mitts/thai pads who goes out of their way to constantly feed angles and targets that require you to use your off hand it becomes more engrained in a way that becomes "combat applicable." Just hitting a static target will help you with form, but you need a sparring partner to help train timing and rythm.

This can also help with grappling also. After rolling enough with my buds, it was very comforting to know that I can catch them with my left arm when going for a choke or armbar opposite my strong side. After a while, they started defending against my stronger arm and I needed to start going to the off hand to catch them. Once I got them worried about both sides, my game got bigger because I had many more options added to my set-ups and attacks.

The Don 07-06-2006 11:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Onganju
I think the biggest obstacle is coming to a point where you need to train while being conscious of the fact that you have to utilize it more. This is where havign a training partner becomes real effective. While being able to just drill repetition on a heavy bag will go a long way, if you have skilled partner with a set of focus mitts/thai pads who goes out of their way to constantly feed angles and targets that require you to use your off hand it becomes more engrained in a way that becomes "combat applicable." Just hitting a static target will help you with form, but you need a sparring partner to help train timing and rythm.

This can also help with grappling also. After rolling enough with my buds, it was very comforting to know that I can catch them with my left arm when going for a choke or armbar opposite my strong side. After a while, they started defending against my stronger arm and I needed to start going to the off hand to catch them. Once I got them worried about both sides, my game got bigger because I had many more options added to my set-ups and attacks.

Excellent advice again I am sure there are others out there who did not even realize they had this problem..


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