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-   -   The Supporting Knee (http://www.mmaforum.com/standup-technique/79672-supporting-knee.html)

meseotheliomia 07-30-2010 04:37 PM

The Supporting Knee
 
I only recently started using kicks in my combat style (well kicks to the upper body anyway) and i think that although they could use work they are effective. I have height in my kicks (I'm about 6 feet and i can kick someone my height in the head), i can generate power, and i have enough speed and form to successfully score a hit when I'm fighting someone The only problem is my supporting knees. Anytime i finish training or shadowboxing (something that involves kicking a lot more than i actually would in a ring or in front of my opponent), my left knee almost always aches afterward. This is weird to me because even though i kick more with my right leg (which would leave my left leg supporting), i still throw kicks with my right leg (leaving the left supporting). Which brings me to my question. When you perform a roundhouse kick or any kick that involves pivoting, do you lock the supporting leg's knee? I've been told that you're supposed to lock it by some people, and I've been told that you're supposed to keep it bent by others. Help would be greatly appreciated as I'm going to start cage fighting in a few weeks.

P.S.
sorry if i got over elaborate and broke everything down like that, i just wanted to make sure i got all the details in without confusing anybody because i had a lot to say.

Thanks

Halfraq9 07-30-2010 07:13 PM

I am not an expert by any means. Whenever I ask these types of questions the answer always seems to be.. "do what feels natural"

This is just a thought, your knee might be hurting because although your body might be twisting, your foot isn't pivoting because it's planted. All that twisting motion might be going into your knee. Have you "angled" your foot and or are you pivoting on the ball of your foot?

Hope this at least gives you something to think about. Good luck.


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