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Sparkes 01-27-2008 08:57 PM

Weight Training Help!
 
Ive been doing serious weight training for 2 years now and have been doing full body workouts around 4-5 times per week. I am now considering switching to split bodypart workouts, still 4-5 times per week. What do you thinks better to do between full body and split bodypart workouts? What are the advantages of split bodypart training?

ps: im of average build and bout 132 pounds, trying to bulk up a bit but not too much. Main focus is to train for karate and boxing.

awake 02-01-2008 11:54 AM

I think 4-5 full body workouts per week is too much, and prevents the muscles from growing faster than it actually can.

It is said that if you for example train chest on monday, you shouldn't train it until wednesday (48 hours later). That goes for most muscle groups when it comes to weight lifting. If you were training your back like 5 days in a row, the back wouldn't have enough time to restituate(sp?), and would go in a catabolic phase.

I'd do a 2-split, if I were you. Train monday, tuesday, thursday and friday.
Day 1: chest, triceps, shoulders, abs. Day 2: back, biceps, feet.

The reason I put chest, shoulders and triceps in the same workout, is because for example in bench press, you utilize all those muscles.

wukkadb 02-01-2008 01:41 PM

Split up your work out into three days: pull/push/squat. Make sure you're doing compound lifts, and eliminate all the machine work. Focus on lifts such as: squats, deadlifts, rows, bench, OH press, etc. Try to keep your rep range around 5 reps as well for strength gains

thai_fighter 02-03-2008 04:43 PM

Spliting your body parts to build muscle mass is the best way to do it. You can give your muscles more of a intense workout then what you can with the program you had before. Split your muscles to 4 dayse a week with a full body power movements on a 5 day. Like chest/tris on monday, back/bis on tuesday, legs on wends., shoulders on thursday with a full body power movements on Saturday. Good luck

wukkadb 02-03-2008 04:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thai_fighter (Post 458816)
Spliting your body parts to build muscle mass is the best way to do it. You can give your muscles more of a intense workout then what you can with the program you had before. Split your muscles to 4 dayse a week with a full body power movements on a 5 day. Like chest/tris on monday, back/bis on tuesday, legs on wends., shoulders on thursday with a full body power movements on Saturday. Good luck

*cough* bad advice

thai_fighter 02-04-2008 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wukkadb (Post 458828)
*cough* bad advice

that is funny it's not that far from yours just a slit bit different. Yours is a good idea to and as a personal trainer I have used your routine for clients to mix their programs up a little bit for a while.

wukkadb 02-04-2008 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thai_fighter (Post 460296)
that is funny it's not that far from yours just a slit bit different. Yours is a good idea to and as a personal trainer I have used your routine for clients to mix their programs up a little bit for a while.

But why would someone interested in fighting have the goal of gaining mass? Also, why would they want isolation? Your routine would be good for bodybuilding and aesthetics, but mine would be geared towards functional strength

thai_fighter 02-04-2008 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wukkadb (Post 460317)
But why would someone interested in fighting have the goal of gaining mass? Also, why would they want isolation? Your routine would be good for bodybuilding and aesthetics, but mine would be geared towards functional strength

for a workout to be geared directly towards mass the person needs to keep the reps between 6 and 12, strength 3-6 with once every to weeks maxing out, and for endurance 12+reps. Now onto the subject of isolation. When you isolate a muscle your force that muscle to do all the work it's self without relying on other muscle to help it. The benifit is that you develope more power more quickly in that muscle in which turns more strength. This will also help in the compound movements like the power clean, squat, bench press, clean and jerk, etc... A person can do just about any workout they want to gain strength as long as they keep on the right reps. When you do the program that I metioned in my first post that was just an example program, you are able to really focus on that muscle to make it stronger if you do 3-6 reps per set(s). This will make sure that muscle will get stonger faster. Now that I have mentioned sets. For good gains in strength a beginner should start with 3 sets for the first month and then add on more sets to every exercise to keep the intensity of the exercise up and the gains coming.

Now onto your routine, it's a good routine but it is also used for bodybuilding. Ronnie Coleman used that exact routine back in 2001. So it is not just geared towards functional strength. It's purpose rests in the number of reps, sets, and it's intensity, there are other things that deside it's purpose whether it be stength/mass/or endurance but those three primarly decide what direction you are going in.

wukkadb 02-05-2008 02:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thai_fighter
When you isolate a muscle your force that muscle to do all the work it's self without relying on other muscle to help it. The benifit is that you develope more power more quickly in that muscle in which turns more strength.

I disagree with your views on isolation, and the whole point of functional strength is using a lot of muscles at one time, hence them being compound movements. Also, a push/pull/squat routine is a common PL'ing routine, not one for bodybuilders. Bodybuilders train for mass, symmetry, and aesthetics, which is usually not the same goal as fighters/athletes.

thai_fighter 02-05-2008 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wukkadb (Post 460765)
I disagree with your views on isolation, and the whole point of functional strength is using a lot of muscles at one time, hence them being compound movements. Also, a push/pull/squat routine is a common PL'ing routine, not one for bodybuilders. Bodybuilders train for mass, symmetry, and aesthetics, which is usually not the same goal as fighters/athletes.

Ok well your views are my views and mine are mine. I do think that you need to do a little research in the matter of fitness. I personally have spent a year to get my personal trainers cert. and have been training fighters for years now. But hey to each their own bro.


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