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SurfNinja 10-01-2007 11:47 PM

SurfNinja's Training Log
 
Well I finally stumbled across this section of MMA Forum and decided to make my own log. It's probably not going to be as intense as most other logs on this site but hell I'm a freshman in college and at least I'm staying away from drugs and alcohol.

This is mostly going to be a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu log with minor conditioning, since that's all I got right now, but in time I hope to join either an MMA or Muay Thai gym to seek further training. I am undecided on whether I am going to compete or not.

My Stats: (as of 1/14/08)
Grade - College freshman
Age - 18
Height - 5'11
Weight - 128 lbs.
Sex - Yes please

Martial Arts Training Background: (as of 10/1/07)
Middle School
- 1.5 years of Tae Kwon Do (2 times a week @ dojo).
High School
- 5 months of casual Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu training (once a week w/ small group).
- 8 months of Muay Thai training (2 times a week w/ personal trainer).
College
- 1 month of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at my college gym (2 times a week w/ medium sized class).

...and 0 street fight experience, although I did make a kid cry in elementary school by soccer-kicking him in the shin.

SurfNinja 10-02-2007 02:16 AM

Reflection on previous weeks
 
I'll start with a reflection on my last three (Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu) sparring sessions.

I usually have the same partner, Nick, who is a little shorter and has some more meat than me, but nonetheless is the closest match to my body type in our BJJ class. We also have around the same experience, he learns from his friend and I have learned from my little class from high school. So you could say my experience is a little more formal, but his is a little more rugged and has suited him well in sparring so far.

I'm going to explain my sparring sessions in a play-by-play format, because it's impossible to remember all the little details and I don't want to create the dreaded "wall of text".

Sparring session #1: w/ Nick
- We tie up, he achieves the takedown, lands in my guard.
- He performs a can opener + stack and passes my guard, lands in side control.
- I manage to bridge escape side control and shoot for a takedown, but he catches me in a guillotine.
- He makes it a standing guillotine and I tap.
- Me: 0, Nick: 1
**Notes: I later explained the guillotine from the guard to him, because the only guillotine he knew was the standing one and it was supposed to be a sparring session on the knees. I can argue the tapout because he didn't have it sunk yet and I didn't want to be standing up awkwardly. But still, a tap is a tap.

Sparring session #2: w/ Nick
This round was very explosive/sloppy one, and thus difficult to remember.
- We tie up, he gets the takedown.
- We scramble, at one point I attain side control.
- He escapes side control, and we scramble again.
- He manages to get the mount, but I quickly bridge and escape.
- Another scramble, and he snatches a guillotine. I ride it out and eventually escape and scramble.
- He gives up his back, and I sink a rear naked choke.
- I am squeezing the choke and then the round times ends.
- Me: 0, Nick: 1, Draws: 1
**Notes: I had really underestimated him until this time. He put up a lot more of a fight than I thought he would, and we both had respect for each other's grappling. We established that we're a good match for one another, and now we're unofficial sparring partners.

Sparring session #3: w/ Nick
I had been suffering from food poisoning this practice. Not that I'm making excuses... I'd just like to say that Pepto Bismol is magic.
- We tie up, I pull off a single leg takedown and land in his guard.
- I break his closed guard, and attempt to pass.
- After a struggle, he manages a sweep and lands in the mount.
- I bridge several times but he manages to hold on, so I try an elbow escape.
- Right as I pull half-guard he snatches my right arm and locks a very tight Americana.
- I desperately try for full guard, but am forced to tap before I can do anything productive.
- Me: 0, Nick: 2, Draws: 1
**Notes: He showed me how to do the sweep he performed on me, which his friend had taught him before class. We practiced the sweep a little, and class ended. This was the first time I had learned he had a friend teaching him, and it marks the second time I underestimated this guy. I was happy with this session, for it marks the first single leg takedown I've ever pulled off in sparring, and I also learned a new sweep.

SurfNinja 11-04-2007 12:13 AM

My 6 week's recovery period from appendix surgery is nearly over (thank God).

I will begin shadowboxing and stretching next week. Weight lifting and martial arts are still out of the question, too much physical stress or a blow to my midsection could cause a hernia or worse.

SurfNinja 01-06-2008 12:50 AM

Well it's been a while. I'm on a 5 week winter break, and I've resumed Muay Thai training twice a week with a personal trainer. I did BJJ for the first time in months two days ago, and had a good lesson, mostly focusing on side control this time. Then I sparred my trainer for an hour and a half straight, by the end I thought I was gonna die lol. Good lesson, I got caught in some wicked submissions (a neck crank that hurt like a mother to name one), and I managed to catch my trainer in a triangle but he escaped after I exhausted my legs trying to finish him for a minute or so.

Things learned:
- My wiry body is a big plus
- Apparently I am hard to armbar
- Neck cranks hurt
- You should tap when you're in an ankle lock even if it doesn't hurt yet(?) That's what he told me when he caught me in one...

rufio.e0 01-07-2008 03:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SurfNinja (Post 431124)
Things learned:
- My wiry body is a big plus
- Apparently I am hard to armbar
- Neck cranks hurt
- You should tap when you're in an ankle lock even if it doesn't hurt yet(?) That's what he told me when he caught me in one...

I might be wrong about this but not all ankle locks require a tap before it hurts. Straight ankle locks hurt like hell but you don't have to tap (eventually it will break your foot, but he has to be fully extended and if you "have your boot on" you can avoid that). Heel hooks, however, tap when you feel pressure in your knees.... if you want to keep your ACL/MCL attached.

Quote:

Originally Posted by SurfNinja (Post 354625)
...and 0 street fight experience, although I did make a kid cry in elementary school by soccer-kicking him in the shin.

LMFAO

Great log. :thumbsup:

SurfNinja 01-07-2008 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rufio.e0 (Post 432224)
I might be wrong about this but not all ankle locks require a tap before it hurts. Straight ankle locks hurt like hell but you don't have to tap (eventually it will break your foot, but he has to be fully extended and if you "have your boot on" you can avoid that). Heel hooks, however, tap when you feel pressure in your knees.... if you want to keep your ACL/MCL attached.

Hmm maybe you're right because I didn't feel anything but he trainer was like "you gotta tap!" and I was like "...why?" He was doing a heel hook.

SurfNinja 01-12-2008 10:18 PM

Sparred with 2 of my friends today and went over some basic submissions with them.
Friend#1 = 170~175lbs. Friend#2 = 120lbs. Me = 128lbs.

Again, I don't exactly remember every detail, but I'm trying my best.

Vs. Friend#1
- He takes me down, struggles around in my guard.
- Puts me in a kimura (while in my guard) that causes me discomfort but cannot finish me.
- I manage to free one of his arms and lock a triangle.
- He struggles for a minute so I look for the armbar.
- He won't let me take the arm so I thrust my hips up and finally seal the triangle, he taps.

Vs. Friend#2
- He takes me down with a big double leg, lands in mount.
- I escape to half guard, attempt to get 'the lockdown'.
- He catches me in a Jens Pulver style guillotine-headlock from on top.
- I struggle, roll to my side which seals the choke tighter.
- My ears begin to ring and my head feels light, I tap. I was nearly asleep lol.

Vs. Friend#1 Part 2
- We have a stalemate-like takedown, both landing on our sides.
- He scrambles onto my back, both hooks in.
- I get arm control, he gives up on the RNC and I flip over into his mount.
- I get to half guard and sweep him.
- I get to side control, attempt an Americana.
- He powers out of it, defends my next attempts well so I transition to the mount.
- He makes multiple attempts to buck me but I maintain the mount, I begin working for armlocks.
- He defends all of my submission attempts, I'm working for the arm triangle, and the round timer rings.

Vs. Friend#1 Part 3
- I get underhooks and the takedown.
- He throws me in a guillotine.
- I attempt to pass his guard, he stands up.
- I sling my hand over his neck and grab his arms with my other hand, attempting to create breathing space.
- I fall back into his guard, still manage to hold on.
- He stands up again, and this time it's deep. I tap.


F***in guillotines man, I must have bad defense against them, which is bad because its like the most common submission. There were more rounds than this, but I don't remember, and there was probably a lot more to the rounds than I explained above, but hey its fast-paced action I can't remember all the details. I think I escaped from an armbar sometime in one of those rounds, which I was proud of, but I forget which.

wukkadb 01-12-2008 11:05 PM

For defending the guillotine make sure you are defending your neck with one hand, and then circle around to the opposite side of the guillotine while also trying to rotate your hips and your head, and also putting your chin down and to the same side. It's very important to turn your body the opposite way of the guillotine when it is initially applied, this helps with creating a better angle for you so it's more of a neck crank and not a choke.

SurfNinja 01-13-2008 05:41 PM

Thanks I'll really try to remember that. That's the only sub they ever get on me, and it's getting old.

*Edit - Keeping wukka and IronMan's responses to my question "how do you pass a larger fighter's guard?"

Quote:

Originally Posted by wukkadb
Stand up, or bait the armbar/triangle and then escape that way.

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronMan
I pretty much agree with wukka on this one, though there are a few points that I think can be added to really improve the efficiency of your guard pass, especially against stronger guys.

The first is to use your knee as a seperator as soon as he opens his guard. Once you have your knee between you and your opponent, there are all sorts of over/under passes that are really effective and it also sets up a nice straight ankle lock. As an added bonus, unless your opponent's legs are really long, he's not going to be able to close his guard.

Second, when you are doing the standup pass, make sure to keep your feet back and slip both of your arms under both of his legs very quickly. Once you do that, you're basically past, but if you keep your feet in and your opponent grabs on of them, you will get swept, regardless of where your hands are.

I definitely, from personal experience, like to use a can-opener, though I'm aware that in most gyms it is against the rules. Definitely learn it, though, because it is very, very effective as both a submission and a way to open up guard.

The inside hands pass, where you slip your hands inside your opponents guard so that your bicepts are under his thighs, is really effective against bigger guys, because their legs can get a little loose against a smaller opponent, though their really most effective against an active guard.

Hope that was helpful.


SurfNinja 01-15-2008 02:17 AM

I'm looking at my college schedule and the available MMA/Muay Thai gyms around the area, and things aren't looking too good. However, there is a Carlson Gracie BJJ gym 2 mins. away from my dorm, and another BJJ school that has a fellow college student I know who works there. So I might just have to stick to doing BJJ for the semester. If that is the case, then I'm really going to have to remember what I'm learning in Muay Thai right now, so I can at least practice it in shadow boxing.

My favorite Muay Thai techniques/combos to remember
Basics:
- (Switch kicking sides up) 1, 2, 3, 4 + RK/LK
- 1, 2, body hook + RK
- Front teep + switch kick/knee + R cross, L hook, RK
- Roundhouse kick + side kick
- Jab + front elbow
- Intercept roundhouse w/ low leg kick
- Shuffle forward + back kick
- Savate-style rocking switch-back kick

Feint combos: (Remember to pause a half-beat after feint)
- Feint step LLK, jab + cross/RK
- Feint cross, left hook + RK/knee strike/body cross
- Feint axe kick/switch kick + back kick
- Feint right hook/overhand + left uppercut (Roy Jones Jr. KO style)
- Feint left hook + right cross
- Feint roundhouse (feint forward, then slide foot into position) + back kick
- Feint(miss) roundhouse (use the hips and let it fall across, expose your back) + side kick

Combos after blocks: (Speed - "Bang bang bang!")
- Block left hook -> L hook, R cross, L hook + RK
- Block right hook/loop cross -> R cross, L hook, R cross + LK
- Block left body hook -> L uppercut, R cross, L hook + RK
- Block right body hook -> R uppercut, L hook, R cross + LK
- Block roundhouse kick -> throw leg to opposite side + leg kick
- Block LLK -> LK, R cross, L hook + RK
- Block RLK -> RK(hop kick), L hook, R cross + LK
- Grab/scoop Teep -> throw leg + kick (inside or outside)

Bobbing & Weaving (KEEP EYES OPEN AFTER THE SLIP, HOLD ON THE DUCKING 'TILL 2nd SHOT COMES, KEEP FORWARD PRESSURE)
- Slip jab -> R cross, L hook, R cross (+ LK)
- Slip cross -> L hook, R cross, L hook (+ RK)
- Slip jab + duck right hook/cross -> L hook, R cross, L hook (+ RK)
- Slip cross + duck left hook -> R cross, L hook, R cross (+ LK)
- Duck left hook -> R cross, L hook, R cross (+ LK)
- Duck right hook -> L hook, R cross, L hook (+ RK)

"In fighting": (Cover TIGHT, create space & explode!)
- R body uppercut>>head uppercut + L hook
- L body uppercut>>head uppercut + R cross
- Clinch, knees, elbows, dumps & crossface shove + kick

Things I need to remember:
- Relax.
- Don't look at where you're punching, always keep eyes on opponent's center.
- Jab & Cross, keep them linear as possible, and snap quickly.
- Pressure forward when attacking, don't flinch, and retreat after your combo!
- KEEP OTHER HAND UP WHILE PUNCHING OR COACH WILL KEEP HITTING YOU
- Add feints into any combo, make the feint believable with grunting, expression, etc.
- Multiple jabs, multiple kicks, happy coach.
- It's all about the sway and rhythm.


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