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Old 05-20-2010, 12:46 PM   #281 (permalink)
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The difference, I think, is the regularity of the injury. I see injured metatarsals all the time, but very rarely an injured shin.
Agreed, the ratio is rather stacked on the injured metatarsus side.
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Old 05-25-2010, 11:50 PM   #282 (permalink)
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Back at Rocha BJJ

Well, I'm back in Oakland for the summer, and while I miss doing judo and kickboxing in Frenso, I love coming home to Rocha Academy in Oakland.

I helped (as I usually do) with the kids class. Since there's usually one bigger kid (at the moment, it's Jake) who has no one to roll with, I roll with him.

Unfortunately, I didn't feel good at all during training tonight. I popped my shoulder out (which is becoming a recurring injury) early with Jake, so I did the warm up conditioning with Vernie and some basic technical stuff and sat out the rolling. The problem, of course, is that either my food didn't sit well (which I think makes sense, since I wasn't feeling great heading in) or I'm a bit out of shape after two weeks off. Realistically, it's probably a combination of the two.

Anyway, I threw up (not that abnormal in workouts, but not fun at all) after conditioning, and one of my goals is to get back to a comfortable competition weight over the summer. Right now I'm a little over 160, and I'd like to be down around 145 by the end of the summer.

I guess that goal will give me motivation to get this log rolling again.
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Old 06-23-2010, 11:57 PM   #283 (permalink)
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Comfort Under Pressure

So, I was training with some of my friends at K-ONE Fitness in San Francisco. For those nearby, I highly recommend the coaching there. Stephan Goyne, who's now a BJJ blackbelt, is a phenomenal instructor and the training partners are great.

I was rolling with a couple of different people during the sparring portion of the class and afterwards and one of the things that struck me as I was rolling was the pronounced difference in attitude between myself and a lot of the other students.

I'm still getting my game back up to 100% after months of a certain level of negligence in judo, but I find that I still have a level of comfort under physical pressure. When someone is putting pressure on my legs trying to pass my guard, or pressuring me in side control, I don't panic.

With a lot of things that I've been working on, I've actually had a moment where I realized that its not helpful to panic. I don't think I ever had that in jiu-jitsu. It's one of those things. I've just slowly stopped being worried when I feel weight on top of me.

I don't know where that comes from, but it seems so fundamentally necessary to good (or even passable) jiu-jitsu, it's just more important to think about what's next. With effective use of really important positions in a lot of jiu-jitsu games, just thinking about what's next is important, regardless of the weight that's being placed on you.

I've spent a lot of time working on X-guard and deep half guard, and I'll probably get into those later in the week, this was just a thought from the workout last night.
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Old 06-24-2010, 12:03 PM   #284 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by IronMan View Post
So, I was training with some of my friends at K-ONE Fitness in San Francisco. For those nearby, I highly recommend the coaching there. Stephan Goyne, who's now a BJJ blackbelt, is a phenomenal instructor and the training partners are great.

I was rolling with a couple of different people during the sparring portion of the class and afterwards and one of the things that struck me as I was rolling was the pronounced difference in attitude between myself and a lot of the other students.

I'm still getting my game back up to 100% after months of a certain level of negligence in judo, but I find that I still have a level of comfort under physical pressure. When someone is putting pressure on my legs trying to pass my guard, or pressuring me in side control, I don't panic.

With a lot of things that I've been working on, I've actually had a moment where I realized that its not helpful to panic. I don't think I ever had that in jiu-jitsu. It's one of those things. I've just slowly stopped being worried when I feel weight on top of me.

I don't know where that comes from, but it seems so fundamentally necessary to good (or even passable) jiu-jitsu, it's just more important to think about what's next. With effective use of really important positions in a lot of jiu-jitsu games, just thinking about what's next is important, regardless of the weight that's being placed on you.

I've spent a lot of time working on X-guard and deep half guard, and I'll probably get into those later in the week, this was just a thought from the workout last night.
I have a big problem with this. I can't handle pressure very well. Do you think one can learn to control himself or that it will just come to him?
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Old 06-24-2010, 07:36 PM   #285 (permalink)
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I have a big problem with this. I can't handle pressure very well. Do you think one can learn to control himself or that it will just come to him?
Honestly, I think it's something that takes a lot of time to deal with. You have to get used to it, but there's also something to be said for trying to work through it.

The best thing to do is just to think about what you're going to do next. What is the escape? What should I be attacking? What is next?

That's the thought process for any position, but it's especially important when there's weight on you, and it requires a certain level of focus.
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:34 AM   #286 (permalink)
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Attacking the Turtle

I've spent a lot of time working on adjusting my top game from the turtle that I see in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu to working on the belly down position that I've been seeing from a lot of judo guys. The tend to belly down more completely, not staying on the knees and looking to sit out into guard. Given my approach to the BJJ turtle, which I'll explain in a second, the problems I have with the more complete belly down presents some problems.

I was working the turtle tonight going over some basic techniques from the top and the bottom with Jeremy Adkins tonight, and this is a position I'm really familiar with, and since Jeremy was just teaching the basics, I was pretty familiar with it. Though, as always, he game me some details to keep me occupied.

As I was working with the BJJ guys, I remembered the way I attack the turtle, which has a lot of freestyle wrestling influence. As is typical with the BJJ turtle attack, I drive my hips against the lombard of my opponent. Unlike the typical attack, I try to be much trickier with my hands. I don't commit to gripping the lapel and attacking the back position, not because it's not priority #1 (it has to be, from the turtle) but because that's the attack people anticipate and, against competitive opponents, they usually have a tool in the bag to deal with it.

Instead, I work either underhooking the lapels (with a transition to be more behind the opponent, as opposed to on the side, so they can't roll me) or I start attacking the ankles and (especially in gi) the back of the knee and the thigh.

Attacking these areas allows me to anticipate the rolling attempts to get back to guard which are typical of the turtle position. When an opponent rolls, if I have control of an ankle, i can make sure to stretch that leg out to make for a much easier pass. If I'm holding the back of the knee, it becomes very easy to kill the legs and establish side control.

Now, the problem is that the judo defense for the turtle isn't really a defense for the turtle, at least not from what I've seen in competition and training. It's really just an attempt to stall me out, especially once they work out that I'm very technical and tricky in my newaza.

They don't stay up on the knees and look to roll back to a guard position. Often they try and roll for a pin, if they stay up there, which (apart from being a terrible idea, as it gives me a ton of opportunities to attack the armbar and the clock choke) doesn't happen very often because at the point where they're turtling, they're not going to bother to attempt something tricky. Instead, they extend the legs out, which makes them very tough to attack, keeping their focus on protecting the arms and the neck.

Frankly, I started off getting incredibly frustrated with this position, because I felt like I didn't have any strong attacks from that position. I found myself grinding my opponents face alot, and I found myself driving my knees into my opponents backs and ribs. Not a terrible idea, generally, but still not really effective.

After a while, I decided that when the went for this defense, the best idea was to go back to the conventional attack, which is to hook the lapel under the arm, or to control the arm if possible, and look for the choke, or to roll the opponent onto their back. In terms of judo scoring, the latter is the best option. Anyway, I've been working on a few ways of getting my opponent to his back from that belly down position. I have stuff I'm working on, including an adapted version of the Karelin lift that is pretty effective against training partners my size, bit I'll probably wait until fall to get back into that, as nobody at Rocha BJJ is that intimidated by my attack from the turtle, or at least nobody thinks they're going to get out of it by bellying down.

Anyway, I killed in drilling that position tonight. I was (as is not terribly unusual) the smallest guy in the class by 20+ pounds, but I was also the second most experienced, and managed to get everyone's back multiple times, and come up in side control plenty on the top, and get back to full guard, half guard and even slip past the deep half guard (a la Jeff Glover) to take the back on some of my opponents.
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Old 07-15-2010, 12:07 AM   #287 (permalink)
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Exploring The Peruvian Necktie

I don't usually fight from the top of the sprawl. I'm usually on the bottom, whether I'm coming up to my knees from the open guard with an opponent backing up or whether I'm shooting in for a single, or just looking for a tighter position on my half-guard. I usually end up on the bottom because going to the bottom position in the sprawl is part of my game. I'm not very tall, and so it's easy for me to work from underneath, where I have access to the legs.

Still, I do have wrestlers shoot on me, and I do have guys get underneath me periodically, and so I do end up working from the top of the sprawl periodically.

I don't have a ton of attacks from the top of the sprawl. I don't like to spin for the back, because it's so predicable, and so easy for opponents to open their hips and pull guard.

Personally, I like attacking the neck. Working the guillotine usually forces my opponent to do something stupid with their legs, or distracts them long enough that I can take control of the position, get my hips in deep and look for the gator roll, the guard pass or the finish with the choke.

The one area I've been working on exploring is the Peruvian necktie. I really like the necktie, because it feels like it gets the submission more than the guillotine does, though it only really sets up taking the back. It makes for a nice move if they give you an over/under.

Still, we were working from the butterfly guard with Eduardo tonight, and since the bigger guys like to push me around a little bit and come up to the knees, and I found it a few times. It was incredibly effective.

There are a few things I discovered:
  1. Be patient slipping the back leg over the back. Breaking the grip is hard enough. You don't want them to catch the foot and roll you over because you were being sloppy. This is especially important against guys with long arms.
  2. Don't worry too much about getting the grip tight. It's a waste of upper-body strength.
  3. It doesn't always feel tight, but if you can feel that your not on the chin, but on the neck, with good position on the arm, just grind your opponent down.
  4. Patience is necessary if you're a smaller guy with it, because you may not have the bulk in the arms to just make 'em tap immediately. Again, patience.
There aren't a lot of transitions from that position, and your going to end up in a weak, weak open guard if you lose it, so be careful and make sure you have the hand strength to finish. But if you're not big enough in the arms and chest to finish guys with the anaconda, it's a great alternative.
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Old 07-15-2010, 09:40 AM   #288 (permalink)
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The Peruvian necktie is both a choke and a neck crank right?
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Old 07-15-2010, 11:48 AM   #289 (permalink)
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The Peruvian necktie is both a choke and a neck crank right?
I think Ari Bolden's explanation is pretty good.

He doesn't get into this, but it's basically impossible to crank the neck, because the arm is in the choke. Any attempt to crank the neck isn't going to be that effective, because you're also going through the shoulder, which is much thicker than you'd need it to be in order to crank effectively. Usually neck cranks demand isolating the neck (you can see this in the case opener and versions of the twister that attack the neck).

It's really a choke. It just feels like you're cranking because there's so much space. between your arms and your chest (as opposed to, say, a guillotine or an anaconda, where you're using your chest as a part of closing off the choke). But it's really a head-and-arm choke that should get the tap.
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Old 07-18-2010, 04:19 PM   #290 (permalink)
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I think Ari Bolden's explanation is pretty good.

He doesn't get into this, but it's basically impossible to crank the neck, because the arm is in the choke. Any attempt to crank the neck isn't going to be that effective, because you're also going through the shoulder, which is much thicker than you'd need it to be in order to crank effectively. Usually neck cranks demand isolating the neck (you can see this in the case opener and versions of the twister that attack the neck).

It's really a choke. It just feels like you're cranking because there's so much space. between your arms and your chest (as opposed to, say, a guillotine or an anaconda, where you're using your chest as a part of closing off the choke). But it's really a head-and-arm choke that should get the tap.
Great explanation, I had the same question at the person you quoted. I realize this is a very broad question, but what do you think about neck cranks? I've been asking a lot of guys with more experience than me lately because I really struggle with them. Thanks.
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