IronMan's Log - Page 31 - MMA Forum - UFC Forums - UFC Results - MMA Videos
Training Logs An area to document your training in a journal-format to help benefit others from your routines.

Reply

Old 02-01-2011, 01:46 AM   #301 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
There isn't that much to say today. I did fairly well during rolling. I was rolling with a bigger guy who has some experience but was getting back into training and I pretty thoroughly destroyed him. His cardio was pretty rough, which is what I usually expect when guys are just coming back. I didn't have serious problems passing his guard (my ability to pass the half-guard has really impressed me; I knew that I could usually kill the half-guard before, but I've been feeling really good about closing off the hip and locking my opponents in the cross face and finishing the pass) and that is reassuring, since it makes me feel like my game is slowly returning.

I was working with another guy, closer to my size, who is a competitive grappler, and caught him in a triangle position a few times, but couldn't quite finish it. I realize that I wasn't really effectively closing off the space by grabbing my own ankle and utilizing what I refer to as the collar, the control that the top leg lets you exercise over the posture of your opponent. It's very frustrating to not remember these things that were, for a while, reflexes for me. But it's like riding a bicycle, the higher belts keep reminding me, and it'll be back.

I was working with Jeff, a very largely and very technically skilled brownbelt who's game (and teaching style) I'm really coming to enjoy. I was having a little trouble closing off the hips after freeing my legs from the closed guard, when I was passing by stepping out of the guard and over the legs, and one of my issues is that I try to get around the arms of my opponent by turning my hips, moving side to side, rather than moving in and out.

What Jeff explained to me, and this was incredibly helpful, was that when my opponent was putting his hands on my hips to push me away and shrimp out, if I just backed up and collapsed the arm, it wasn't difficult from there to close off the hips and maintain a good side control. So, it's a thought, and something I'm going to keep working on.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 02-02-2011, 03:41 PM   #302 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
Some Notes on the Half Guard

I've been training BJJ for a while now and one of the positions I've come to love and admire the most, largely because of my exposure to coaches who are really phenomenal at it, is the half guard.

I've had a lot of great guys work through the half guard and impart little gems of wisdom that I've puzzled over. Of all of the people who have influenced my half guard the most, though, I think the most significant is Jeremy Adkins (now a brown belt under Eduardo Rocha), who really taught me the ropes when it comes to weighting, setting up hooks and using the legs and hips to set up sweeps.

I'm not training with Jeremy at the moment, since he's still based out of the bay area, but I was rolling a lot today and jumping half guard periodically, and I was finding myself, despite still being in a state of returning to jiu-jitsu, finding things and thinking to myself, "Jeremy told me that this is how it's supposed to work," and then getting the sweep.

The first thing is to remember the positioning of the hips, keeping one hip off of the ground. The second the hips are flat, the options for the half guard become much slimmer. Now, this is significant in that it gives you the distinction between the top hand (where you're fighting for the underhook) and the bottom hand (which you're trying to keep control of so that you don't get flattened out).

The second thing is to connect the elbow of the top arm to the knee of the top leg as you fight for the underhook, keeping the elbow on the inside of the knee, protecting the arm from being collapsed. One of the brownbelts where I was training now brought this up with some of the other guys, it seems like a fairly universal point. It also allows you to kick through and ensure that you get the underhook, as the leg can open space for the arm to go through, if you decide you want to pop up and attempt a sweep or just ensure that you can threaten the back whenever you want.

The third thing is to not be afraid of compression. This is what I mean, since it's very abstract. In the closed guard, if you get stacked up by a big, strong ogre who can compress your body and make you uncomfortable, you know that you're going to have to alter your position in a disadvantageous way, or open your guard and bail to something else. In the half guard, its important to become comfortable with that compression, and remember that if he's pushing down, it's acceptable not just to threaten to go underneath and lock up the sweep, but to use that as a way, generally, to tighten up the half guard position, as you attack the leg that is not in your guard.

Attacking that other leg with your arms can be dangerous, since it requires reaching, but if your opponent is trying to compress you, committing his weight (especially if he's committing to your shoulders and trying to flatten you out, rotating your hips towards the inside, letting him compress and looking for the sweep can be pretty devastating, as the half guard that it puts you in when you come up is very, very easy to pass.

I've gotten pretty good at attacking the half guard, because most of the guys that I trained with learned their half guard from Jeremy and Stephen and (obviously) Eduardo, and that means that you have to know the passes and execute them well. It also means that, when you're on the bottom, you get to be more acutely aware of what little details you have to look out for on the passes. Pinching the knees in around the thigh of the bottom leg can be very tough to escape. Getting that bottom arm ripped out so that you're flat on your back can be very tough. Whether an opponent keeps his hips low or high when he passes makes a big difference in how you choose to defend.

There's a lot going on in the half-guard, and it's a terrific position for those looking to develop a really challenging game. It takes a lot of time and, because all of your opponent's weight is on top of you, it's not always the most fun position to drill, but it is incredibly useful, sometimes even more than the full guard, especially at the lower level where guys are used to the full guard, but not used to the half.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 01:19 AM   #303 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
I'm still feeling a little sore from yesterday, and I'm busy working on a bunch of stuff for work, so I haven't been posting much, generally. But I have been trying to get in to train some jiu-jitsu. I'm trying to get back in shape by going to the gym (lifting weights, which I really don't like) and making as many BJJ classes a week as possible.

I'm sore from my workout in BJJ on Monday, but the upside is that it reminded me to post a Training Log entry.

We were working butterfly guard in class on Monday and Jeff pointed out that most guys starting to use the butterfly (and most guys generally) have a habit of falling backwards as they load their opponent's weight up. This really is a horrible habit, and you feel it against bigger guys, as you just get smashed all to sh*t a lot of the time.

One of the things that Jeff had everyone working on was falling to the side, in order to control the angle of movement in the standard hook sweep and to ensure establishing better control in top position. That part I felt like I got alright.

But then he started working on defending against the standard method of passing the butterfly as you attempt the sweep, which is to post out, apply pressure and try and crush the guard. I don't know what my issue was, and is, with dealing with this particular attack, but I have a very hard time maintaining the stability of the butterfly guard, keeping my legs out, when I'm under pressure like that.

Jeff pointed out a few details. The first is that I tend to ball up in the butterfly guard, instead of extending my torso, which I think is a product of my being more comfortable in half-guard then spider guard, so I tend to treat it like half guard and try to get in under my opponent, which is a mistake when they're trying to crush me from butterfly. This is the major thing I'm going to work on.

The other is that being on the hip allows for very good transitions to the knees and, if they've secured the whizzer, its easier to sweep from that side position just by using the knee tap. I'm very uncomfortable sweeping from this position (Eddie Bravo calls it the "dogfight" position, if I remember correctly) because I'm a smaller guy and have long arms so I get stretched out a lot and put on my back in side control. Jeff is a big, strong guy but he pointed out that if I keep things compact when I turn out then it's easy to get the sweep as I come up.

Jeff was very helpful, and I felt the movements a lot better as I was rolling. I really feel uncomfortable in butterfly guard, which is not good. But I find the half guard really well from there, and my half guard seem to be coming back to me, as does the x-guard and the ability to get top position from rolling my opponents off of the pass.

I did a good job getting the back against a lot of opponents and Matt (who I think is a blackbelt also, but I'm not sure) had given me a few pieces of advice about establishing back control from the turtle that were working really well.

Matt's advice was really helpful:
  1. Keep the hips low. (I knew this already, but I have to hear it over and over again, especially as I'm coming back to jiu-jitsu; jiu-jitsu means having a more conservative matwork style than judo, so this is important)
  2. Don't be afraid to take the legs out to adjust the hips. In many scenariors, this will score you an extra four points. Often, it will also keep you from ending up on the bottom with him in your guard. (It's not that it's bad to have him in your guard, just that you'd rather have his back about 95% of the time.)
  3. Constantly keep working the hooks in. (Again, this is something that I knew already, but it's been really helpful to hear reiterated repeatedly, because it really is everything when it comes to controlling the back.)
  4. Use the double underhooks first, then transition to the over-under. Often, guys overcommit their hips when they're trying to get the overhook on the back, and since I've been back I've caught myself slipping off the back a few times because I was looking for that Marcelinho-esque backpack position. I have to remember that comes later.
When I start really getting patient, which you should do in the turtle and on the back, and remembering these things, I find I have much more stable position. It's not that I necessarily have a higher rate of submissions (though I probably do, it just doesn't feel that different) but that I don't lose the back because of stupid stuff. And, in my experience, not losing is 70% of winning.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 03:34 PM   #304 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
Grinding 'em Down

I had a good workout today, working through the basic positions with Troy (a purple belt) from the top and maintaining control of the high mount position.

After the standard portion, I was rolling with Marcos, who's not in great shape, though bigger and stronger than I am. I had him in guard and he kept backing out and letting me sit up and attack, or drag him back down and work my guard up high, and then fighting to get out. I kept reversing him and then falling back to my guard, because I really need to work on sweeps from the closed guard (especially the flower sweep, which I have always struggled with against bigger guys) and working on defending the pass, though I've always been good at preventing my opponent from getting their points.

There was a point where, after I popped out to my knees and swept Marcos over, landing in his half guard, he just tapped from exhaustion.

I have never had that happen to me in competition, but it does happen periodically in training. Marcos admitted that I was going to get him anyways, but then he asked how I managed to stay so comfortable on the bottom, and not use very much energy, while he was all burned out.

This one, people who have done jiu-jitsu for a while know the answer to: I was getting the superior positions and letting him struggle to get back to his position. Instead of stopping me where he was strong (postured up in my guard, pressing down on my hips to keep me from sitting up and attacking) he was letting me break his posture. Everybody makes this mistake when they start. Literally everybody thinks that you can rest when you're broken down in guard. You can, if your opponent isn't doing anything, but the reality is that at some point you have to get back to the postured up position, and that's where you're going to expend all of that energy, rather than on passing.

The moral is this: When you need a rest, don't rest in a position where you can't do anything; rest in a position where you can do everything, because while you're resting, chances are your opponent is going to start setting up a preemptive defense, and that allows you to choose how you want to attack. Going second in jiu-jitsu is great, especially when you can use the time that your opponent is on the defensive to set something up.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2011, 02:14 AM   #305 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
Brought to you by the Letter Armbar

I was back on the mat today after about a week off, due to personal conflicts. I really hate taking time off from jiu-jitsu, because I feel like it's a great stress reliever and because I love the energy boost I often feel the morning after I've had a great workout.

Anyway, I was back on the mat today, drilling some basic stuff from the bottom of turtle (where I've found myself a lot lately) and I was escaping fairly effectively. I am still struggling, to some degree, with breaking the grip, but I have worked out some tricks that help a lot, in terms of breaking the hands apart.

Rolling was great. I started off rolling with the son of one of the instructors. He's a great kid, very athletic and aggressive and bouncy. He kept ending up in armbars. He likes to extend his arms a little too much, and it's one of those moves that I really like to exploit. He learned a little bit, and I did too.

One of the good things about working with younger people (he's 15) is that they tend to come up with some interesting stuff. They also tend to really go after the moves that they want. The techniques he attempted weren't all great, but a lot of them were good for me to practice defending, as he was strongly committing to them.

Hopefully I'll be more active in here again, though I won't be around the gym next week. I will say that my forearms were really worked hard in the workout yesterday. It's a great feeling, and hopefully I'll get that little residual sore feeling in the morning.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2011, 12:25 PM   #306 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
Moving Home for Summer

I'm heading back to Oakland for the summer tomorrow. Hopefully I'll be back at Rocha BJJ for the summer. I'm going to try to get a good deal of mat-time, though with my work schedule, that is not always really possible.

Personally, I like the idea of getting three or four nights a week.

On the down-side, if I increase training to more than three times a week, I need to get another gi. My judogi was stolen when my girlfriends car was broken about a month ago. I think I'm gonna replace it with another Keiko (since I love the two that I've had, one of which I still use), but I'm not looking forward to dropping a chunk of change on a new gi.

Still, I'm optimistic about my training. I know that I'll be training more in the fall, since I've set up my schedule so that, if I choose to, I can train five days a week. Hopefully I'll make that happen, since I could really use the workouts. I'd love to be back in fighting shape, especially as I start to wind down college and look towards graduate school.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2011, 12:28 AM   #307 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
Feeling Weak, Being Weak

I had a curious thought being back at the gym today. I have missed training at Rocha BJJ, and I was happy to work with Vernie my first day back. It was a good day, generally, though the first day on a new mat is always challenging, in my experience, regardless of whether I have been training (and I have been, fairly often).

The curious thought requires some context: I got through the conditioning and technique part of the class fairly easily. The techniques were something I was fairly familiar with, omoplata and scizzor sweep, with some basic guard passing. During sparring, though, I hit a mental block. I felt like I couldn't move people, and was getting worn out from the contact. Part of this had to do with my self-consciousness about what is becoming a recurring injury in my left leg (in the knee and, now, in the calf) but mostly it was the psychology of not being able to impose my will when I felt that I should be able to.

I felt like I was weak, and it was discouraging, so I stopped fighting as hard and gave up positions looking for tricky, resistance free ways out. Now, that's a perfectly reasonable approach to jiu-jitsu, I've been told, but it is not mine. I like to fight for positions. I'm a young guy, I'm fast and have reasonable cardio, but I didn't feel like I was winning any of the fights. I stepped off the mat after getting swept during a guard drill, and I thought through the last few rounds, and it was only in hindsight that I realized what the issue was.

It wasn't that I actually was losing those matchups, I was just frustrated because I wasn't winning them easily, in the way that I had intended. I suppose that's a stupid thing to think, in hindsight, because we realize that, in jiu-jitsu, we often have to improvise, we often have to give up on fights, and that doesn't mean that we're losing. But the psychology had put me on tilt.

As soon as that occurred to me, I went back out and did fairly well for myself. I was passing guard well on some of the other veterans, and while I wasn't at the top of my game, I felt far more confident in my ability to do the things that I need to be able to do, both in training and competition, namely: establish dominant top position by passing the guard, exercise patience and restraint in advancing positions from the top position, fight by adjusting weight with my hips, and remember that there is always a place open to go as my opponent looks to escape.

Once I was able to get myself off tilt (which happens everywhere, not just at the poker table) I was able to focus, and the jiu-jitsu was much better. I was still over-committing my weight from side-control against much bigger players, which is a bad habit that I've had for a while, and have been working on breaking. I also caught myself chasing ahead on some techniques, moving too quickly from a double leg to an attempt to pass the guard, and losing positions as a result. But that is really a matter of calming down and breathing, and I suppose that will improve as time goes on, and I start to regain some confidence.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2012, 07:22 PM   #308 (permalink)
Das ▄bermensch
 
wukkadb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 7,633
wukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatnesswukkadb Is Destined For Greatness
Where do you train at? And I take it you're still training, ya?
__________________



What a stud

Quote:
Originally Posted by swpthleg View Post
The power of Aleks, his small baby and pimp hardcore dogs has granted you useful insight, my friend.
wukkadb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2012, 07:23 PM   #309 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
Quote:
Originally Posted by wukkadb View Post
Where do you train at? And I take it you're still training, ya?
Note lately. I'm going to try to get back on a workout schedule at the end of this month. I've been swamped between getting ready to graduate, working and applying for Ph.D. programs.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2012, 03:22 PM   #310 (permalink)
True Grappler
 
IronMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New York City, New York
Posts: 6,222
IronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A BallerIronMan Is A Baller
Back to Work

I've been getting back on the mat for a number of reasons. Primarily, I need the workout and the stress relief, and there really is nothing better the jiu-jitsu for that. The last few days back have been rough, physically, but I'm actually feeling fairly good about my technical skills in returning.

I've spent the last few days drilling half-guard, which is a lot of fun for me, and one of the most useful positions in terms of application in drilling. Working with Jeff and Troy (two of the instructors) on some theory, I'm finally starting to feel like I'm getting somewhere with the position.

Hopefully there will be more entries. I'm a little slammed with work, but I think its worth noting that I'm getting back to business in terms of my ground game.
__________________


Sig by Toxic

Barnett - Toquinho -Werdum - "Nurmie"
Z. Gurgel - Morango - Rocha - Tiequan
IronMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums
Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
Powered by vBulletin Copyright ę 2000-2009 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios