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Old 05-31-2007, 11:34 PM   #61 (permalink)
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The 10 Finger Guillotine

A while ago I got an issue of Ultimate Grappling magazine and one of the cover article was "the Loch Ness Monster of Submission fighting." The article was on Chris Brennan's version of the 10 finger guillotine.

I was training today in my BJJ class and I was getting swept so I sat up to get my chest on top of my opponent's head (this applies neck compression so he gets uncomfortable and uneasy) and I tucked my hands together and put them in his windpipe after I lost my hold on his collar (collar chokes are my typical counter for gi-grappling, while I try to put him in guard). I didn't realize it right away, but this is how you lock down Brennan's version of the 10 finger guillotine.

My opponent was alot bigger, and so he managed to get sprawls his legs out and pass my attempt at spider guard and ended up in a side position. I figured that I had lost the lock, but my philosophy is that if your not 100% sure and it's just training, keep it on as hard as you can to see what happens. Apparently a combination of the choke and the neck compression that I got from forcing his head down with my chest, as well as bridging the hips a little so he couldn't slide into a knee-on-belly position kept him from mounting me and escaping and after about five seconds he tapped.

There are two points, the first is the submission. In the article, it was a while ago, so I'll try and dig up what month it was, Brennan really only shows the application from guard positions (position than submission, right), but it's an effective submission from the bottom of side control as well, as long as you have it locked in before he get's there.

Second, when you are training and you aren't sure if something is going to work, try it. That's what training is for. Try new submissions in sparring, because training is about learning and expanding your knowledge. Give it a shot before crunch time, that way when the time comes to actually use it, you'll know whether or not it works.
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Old 06-07-2007, 12:41 AM   #62 (permalink)
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The Stomp Kick

I've been training BJJ know with Eduardo Rocha for a little while. Eduardo is a PanAm champion in BJJ and fought Vale Tudo for a while, but I always run stuff by him for the street or for MMA, because he's a smart guy and a beast on the ground.

He ran a class the other day on the takedown and setting up the takedown. It was straight wrestling and Judo, mostly pretty basic stuff that I had seen before in my other training, but he had us work at the end on setting it up in a standup fight or a Vale Tudo style fight.

Alotof BJJ guys have probably seen this, but he was showing us how to work from a thigh kick. He used the kick to keep himself distanced away from the opponents hands so he doesn't get smacked in the face and KO'd. He uses the stomp kick to take away his opponents base so he couldn't get any power behind the punches and then he planted the foot on the ground behind the leg, a la straight wrestling shot.

He was using the kick as a starter step to get in close enough to shoot without exposing himself to the knees or the hands of his opponents. Granted, I have a hard time with this because I'm short and have proportionately small limbs, but the kick is something that is important to think about standing up because, even in an exchange of punches, I can use the kick to take away my opponents base and take the fight to the ground quickly and without risking any more damage than I would have ended up recieving in the standup fight.

I also realized: That's what those f*cked up kicks Royce Gracie uses are for.
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Old 06-11-2007, 04:50 PM   #63 (permalink)
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My friends and I were watching the Rampage Jackson tribute show of PRIDE on FSN last night and one of them suggested that I start blogging on MMA to get people informed and to throw my ideas, and alot of the ideas that are on the forum, out there.

My training stuff will still be listed here, and I'll still be on the forum but I'll throw out, in-depth, some of my ideas about the sport, the fighters and the politics of it.

If anyone is interested, you can check it out at IronSport
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Old 06-23-2007, 05:12 PM   #64 (permalink)
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The Big Submission

I decided to head to the gym with some of my buddies who train in various other styles and do some sparring. I though that it'd be fun to see how we all matchup, since we're all different sizes and we all have different builds.

I am the most well versed in submission of all of the guys I train with. There are some judo guys, but my jiu-jitsu and catch wrestling is on a much higher level than those guys.

I should probably note that all of my friends are big UFC fans (not necessarily MMA fans), and so they know a lot about the different submissions and they have a certain level of anticipation for my submissions.

I found it really difficult to get an armbar against a lot of the grapplers, especially the wrestlers, because of how strong they are. The strikers I could pretty much submit with whatever I wanted, just because they didn't know what was going on, but there was something I thought was really interesting.

I had 14 sparring matches over the course of the day and I found myself using one of my submissions over and over again, I used it 8 times. It had a 100% success rate.

The Big Submission: Toe-Hold

I realized that the guys who watch the UFC and know I train in BJJ anticipate the armbar and the triangle, so when they feel my legs coming they know to keep their elbows in and to stop trying to go through my guard. They even anticipate the kimura's and the keylocks, but the toehold is something that they see so rarely in the UFC that they don't know how to get out of it.

I realized in training that even though I was wrapping my legs around and they knew that it was coming by the 4th ro 5th time I did it, they just didn't know how to get out.

Because the armbars, the triangles and the keylocks are textbook BJJ, everyone who watches the UFC and practices a grappling style thinks about how to defend them, but when you throw something at them that most BJJ guys don't pull out of their arsenals in their fights, they don't know what's going on.

The moral of the story: every grappler, every fighter, should learn how to defend submissions, but it is important to learn the stuff that you don't see all the time, too. It's good to know the heel-hooks and the kneebars, because they are important to anticipate as well, but also because when you get in a match with a guy only prepared for the text book, it's good to hit him with something new.

So get comfortable with submissions that you don't think you're necessarily going to use. In the same way get yourself comfortable with some of the fundamentals of judo throws, so that you can anticipate when an opponent is going to try and toss you on your head.

The textbook is important, but as the sport evolves, it's just as important, perhaps even more so, to expand your knowledge of the sport beyond just the handful of styles that are respresented in the UFC. Branch out and learn stuff, that's what keeps the sport evolving and that's what takes us, as fighters, to the next level.
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Old 06-23-2007, 09:19 PM   #65 (permalink)
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Because the armbars, the triangles and the keylocks are textbook BJJ[/font]
I was looking through an old Judo book made around the time when Helio Gracie was fighting and i noticed it has alot of things not practiced as much now because most dojo's practice for the sport of Judo not Judo itself but i knew this to some extent but the Rear Naked Choke, Triangle Choke(both legs and arms), Guillotine Choke, Armbar, Kimura, Americana(not sure if thats what it is in BJJ), Armbars and a few other submissions are all in Judo and it was before BJJ came to the world and the takedowns Scissor takedown, single and double leg takedown are all in Judo but i noticed how much of BJJ was Judo and i knew that Judo played a part in the making of BJJ but seeing so much of it surprised me, although BJJ is more technical than Judo newaza(ground techniques)seeing as even know Judo has alot of the techniques of BJJ, a BJJer is bound to catch a Judoka in a submission due to being in a bad position.
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Old 06-24-2007, 12:43 PM   #66 (permalink)
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Good post.

It's interesting that you mention that, because alot of people make the mistake of thinking that BJJ comes from Japanese Jiu-Jitsu. The first Gracies were taught Judo, not Japanese Jiu-jitsu, so that is where the techniques come from and that's why alot of BJJ techniques are based on Judo moves, some of which are still practiced, some of which are not.

Helio was pretty open about learning from judoka who were at the top of their game. Even in defeat he made sure that he learned something. After all, that's how the Kimura became a standard BJJ technique.

Alot of judoka stopped teaching those older techniques when they stopped working against BJJ fighters because of the way that BJJ adapted the leverage to make the techniques more effective.

The thing about BJJ is that it didn't really come from anything new because it's really hard to find a submission that is entirely new, even seventy years ago. What the Gracies did was adapt their submissions to make them work for a smaller fighter, like Helio, or Royce in the early UFCs.

You know, some people believe that there's nothing new under the sun, but the fact is, we get new techniques and evolve the level of combat by adapting things like leverage to create a better submission, or a submission that is easier to get to. That's how submission fighting constantly evolves.

The point that I was trying to make is that even though there's nothing new, there's still alot to learn, and since most people aren't even aware that these things work or what they look like, it might as well be new.
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Old 06-25-2007, 01:53 AM   #67 (permalink)
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Great post aswell.

I agree with you and i agree so much that even though i know quite a bit about BJJ techniques through Judo i still want to learn BJJ for much more things to learn not just techniques.

And yes it is interesting you mentioned the Helio Gracie and Masahiko Kimura fight...this is the video of it.(it is very unclear)

YouTube - judo vs jujutsu
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Old 06-25-2007, 01:52 PM   #68 (permalink)
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Great post aswell.

I agree with you and i agree so much that even though i know quite a bit about BJJ techniques through Judo i still want to learn BJJ for much more things to learn not just techniques.

And yes it is interesting you mentioned the Helio Gracie and Masahiko Kimura fight...this is the video of it.(it is very unclear)

YouTube - judo vs jujutsu
Yeah, BJJ is definitely good for learning leverage and it's applicable to all different styles of submission fighting. As far as I'm concerned, anyone who's looking to compete in MMA should learn BJJ, because it's going to come up eventually.

For those who don't know who's who in that video. Helio Gracie is the skinny one and Kimura is the one that gets the initial throw.
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Old 06-26-2007, 01:39 PM   #69 (permalink)
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Since I got back in the states about six months ago I've been doing free-running, which is a european sport, also known as Parkour. I've been on it on my own time as a way of keeping up my cardio and toning the whole body.

Parkour is basically a martial art within itself. It's called "modern ninjutsu" by some, but mostly it's just the art of movement. It's the way of getting from point a to point b with absolute grace and doing things that we don't think about. It's like a sport where all you need is your body and the cityscape.

I know that my approach sounds a little bit far fetched, but if anyone is interested I can start a thread on Parkour as a park of MMA training, which is what it is becoming for me.
ive heard a little bit about it but yea u should definitely start that thread id like to know a little bit more about it
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Old 06-26-2007, 01:51 PM   #70 (permalink)
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ive heard a little bit about it but yea u should definitely start that thread id like to know a little bit more about it
There was a thread posted on it a while ago. I don't know what happened to it since then.

If you want more information on Parkour, check out Le PARKOUR
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