Brookins putting MMA on hold and going on a spiritual quest to India - MMA Forum - UFC Forums - UFC Results - MMA Videos
UFC The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is a U.S.-based mixed martial arts organization, recognized as the largest MMA promotion in the world. The UFC is headquartered in Las Vegas, Nevada and is owned and operated by Zuffa, LLC. This promotion is responsible for solidifying the sport's postion in the history-books. UFC is currently undergoing a remarkable surge in popularity, along with greater mainstream media coverage. UFC programming can now be seen on FOX, FX, and FUEL TV in the United States, as well as in 35 other countries worldwide.

Reply

Old 12-21-2012, 05:58 PM   #1 (permalink)
....Omar Comin'
 
El Bresko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Sydney, Australia.
Posts: 4,797
El Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings SystemEl Bresko Is Beyond A Rankings System
Brookins putting MMA on hold and going on a spiritual quest to India

Quote:
Up until about the third minute of his fight last weekend in Las Vegas, UFC featherweight and Ultimate Fighter winner Jonathan Brookins was actually beating up Dustin Poirier. This seemed to surprise pretty much everyone, including Jonathan Brookins. Not because he didnít believe he was capable of beating Poirier but because he didnít want to be fighting at all. Walking into the Octagon that night, his mind was 1000 miles away -- or rather 8000 miles away Ė floating through the ether.

Next month, Brookins will be traveling to India on a spiritual quest, and he doesnít know when, or even if, heíll be back. After winning the Ultimate Fighter in 2010, Brookins has been on something of a downward slide Ė going 1-4 in the UFC, losing his house in Orlando after most of his money had run out. Since then heís bounced around from couch to couch and gym to gym, searching for something. Now that his fight with Poirier is in the past, Brookins feels free to go searching outside the world of mixed martial arts. This made us curious, so we called him recently at his home in Orlando, where heís getting ready for his next, more spiritual, journey.



Fightland: So you mentioned having to sell your house. Is it hard to make a career in MMA, even when youíve made it to the UFC?
Jonathan Brookins: Itís not hard to make a career in the UFC. If you really want it, you can make it happen. I think I just talked myself of really wanting it. I donít know if I talked myself out of it or if I really donít want it anymore. That made it tough to keep going and to fight last weekend. I didnít really have much fight left in me. I kind of hit a dead end.

I definitely had my mind on other things I wanted to do and pursue. I just stopped believing in the fight business and stopped believing in what it was I was even doing. I just didnít quite understand. There wasnít much that I wanted about that (Poirier) fight.

Were you in the Octagon thinking about India?
I think I was. I think I was ready to go to India and learn something else. Pursuing this sport with the mindset that I have is counterproductive. It didnít make sense. Mindset is everything. If this is what Iím going to do with the rest of my life it canít just be a circular argument. It canít just be about nothing. This quest to be a fighter has gotten to be frivolous, to be the wrong pursuit. I know it can be pursued the right way, but I know I'm not anywhere close to it. Iím not really down to live this temporary, right-now way of life.

What are you looking for?
Iím looking for a mindset to exist better. I think that I can find a happiness about myself, a way of living, where my constitution is more sound. I think that martial arts has been a positive, but it hasnít been as much as it could be. I want to find martial arts for real. Yoga just seems to me like one of the oldest forms of martial arts. It seems like the very beginning. When the Shaolin monks wanted to learn to fight, there was a yoga teacher who taught the monks how to exercise and how to defend themselves Ė how to properly prepare themselves, prepare their bodies, prepare their minds. So starting with yoga just seems so natural to me.

I want to say something with my fighting. I want to find the truth. We have the potential for greater consciousness. I want to abstain from this world and tap into the human soul and see what itís like to live.

You said you learned some lessons during the run-up to the Poirier fight.
There were real heavy lessons. Sometimes you lose a fight and you have to go searching for the lessons. Maybe you go on a long run and youíre running the fight through your mind a million times Ė why did this happen? -- and then after a lot of soul searching the answer hits you. But this one was just loud and clear. Before the fight I came in a little bit overweight. Mostly because I was bounding around a lot Ė living in Oregon then New York then Montreal. But everything was real sporadic. So I was cutting weight, and I went to a bikram yoga class, something I do all the time. This was Wednesday, and the weigh-in was Friday. I started to get real dizzy after running that morning and sitting in a salt bath and then the yoga class. I got dizzy like I was going to pass out. By the end of the class, I was cramping up. My feet were cramping. By the end of the class I think I hit severe dehydration. My legs cramped up really bad. I couldnít move. I was exhausted, like I was going to die. My neck, back, and chest all cramped up. I felt tired and weak. I started throwing up all night and was real sick.

I thought about quitting the fight. I was dehydrated, but I still had six or seven pounds to lose. Everything was all off. So I was asking myself, ďWhat do you really want out of this experience?Ē And all I could think about was going to India. You already know you ****ed your body up; thereís no way youíre going to recover fully in just a couple of days. Why would I go ahead with the fight instead of asking to reschedule? Then I thought about going to India in January. That was loud and clear.

At the weigh-ins, I could see myself on the Jumbotron. I was like, ďShit man, you look kind of pathetic. You donít look like youíre ready to fight; you look skinny.Ē The kid (Poirier) walks up to me after the weigh-ins and gets in my face and says, ďI want it more than you.Ē All tough guy: ďI want it more than you, bro.Ē I was like, ďWhat the ****? How does this kid know he wanted it more than me?Ē It was an interesting thing to say but it was really true. It was the weirdest true shit-talking Iíd ever heard in my life. Usually people just talk shit and youíve got a rebuttal. That was the first time it really made me think.

Ideally, will India help you get back to fighting or are you open to the idea of not fighting again, if thatís where your mind goes?
Yeah, Iím open to that, thatís for sure. All the things I didnít learn in fighting to better myself I feel like I can explore in this avenue. If it means extra effort or extra solitude, Iím going to pursue this harder than I even pursued fighting. I feel like it could make me a much better fighter, but if it leads me to not fight again, I think I would be okay with that.

Are you optimistic about the future?
I am. Itís all mindset now. I know that nothingís going to go wrong because I have the gift of this mindset this kid (Poirier) gave me to win. All he had to do was tell me he wanted it more. Thatís easy enough; I can want a lot of things. And I know the formula to make it happen. And this is just a step to helping me live that lifestyle. If I want to come back and be the greatest fighter in the world, I have the lifestyle that will allow me to get things I want. Thatís want I want to gain over there in India.
http://fightland.vice.com/blog/jonat...ving-for-india
__________________






El Bresko is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 12-21-2012, 06:34 PM   #2 (permalink)
The Bearded One
 
AmdM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon - Portugal
Posts: 3,847
AmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings SystemAmdM Is Beyond A Rankings System
That's some great, yet crazy interview.

This part is gold, it deserves to be put on a book:

Quote:
At the weigh-ins, I could see myself on the Jumbotron. I was like, ďShit man, you look kind of pathetic. You donít look like youíre ready to fight; you look skinny.Ē The kid (Poirier) walks up to me after the weigh-ins and gets in my face and says, ďI want it more than you.Ē All tough guy: ďI want it more than you, bro.Ē I was like, ďWhat the ****? How does this kid know he wanted it more than me?Ē It was an interesting thing to say but it was really true. It was the weirdest true shit-talking Iíd ever heard in my life. Usually people just talk shit and youíve got a rebuttal. That was the first time it really made me think.
__________________
Lyoto Machida, former UFC LHW hamp
Future UFC MW Champ
Benavidez, Barao, Aldo, Nate, Nick, Lyoto, TBD, JDS
Forever hanging in Anderson Silva nuts
AmdM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 07:03 PM   #3 (permalink)
It's Hammer Time!
 
Hammerlock2.0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 9,241
Hammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings SystemHammerlock2.0 Is Beyond A Rankings System
"I'm overweight... better go to India!" - the essence of this interview
__________________


Rookie Hammer Squad 2015
Frankie Edgar - Dominick Cruz - Jorge Masvidal - Cat Zingano - Holly Holm
Hammerlock2.0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 07:28 PM   #4 (permalink)
BEWARE OF THE PENGUIN!
 
No_Mercy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,483
No_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF MaterialNo_Mercy Is Future HOF Material
He's too nice of a guy to be a fighter. Same with GSP, but he has inner rage from his childhood. Mental toughness is everything.

I categorize fighters into these following categories.

Natural born killers. No, Stephan is not one of em. I mean Wandy, Shogun, Mirko at one point, Chuck Liddell, Jose Aldo, etc. They either knock out people or get knocked out themselves. Always hunting for the knock out. You can tell from their staredowns, interviews, and of course how they fight. They never play safe. They always go for broke.

Silent assassins. Fedor was primo for a decade. Mirko with no emotions from his staredowns, Gegard Mousassi is another. LHW title holder is up there. Let their actions do the talking. Anderson Silva sits on the throne now.

Journey men. Decent records, but will never become champions. Ebersole, Dennis Hallman, Gumby, etc.

Fringe fighters who need money. These end up being the worst fighters throughout their career because they're purely motivated for financial reasons. Think for a second. They may fight lackluster (safe) to win OR may go all out to try to win a fight bonus usually leaving openings for a bad knockout.

Dilletantes. Batista whom I have no problems with at all, fits in this category. Anyone who dabbles in it without any liklihood of ever getting into the big leagues.

To me that's the pecking order. You have to be mean when it comes down to business. You have to want to hurt somebody and be able to set your emotions aside win or lose. I think Brookins is a class act. But it really looks like he's going through the motions when he's fighting these days. Take for example Colton. Not very skilled, but you can tell he wants it badly and is willing to play dirty.

In conclusion MMA has to be THE TOUGHEST JOB ever. Nobody lasts forever. You will get beat one way or another. I think after watching "The Smashing Machine" it really opened up my eyes even more to the sport.
__________________
Marcus Aurelius: Tell me again, Maximus, why are we here?
Maximus: For the glory of the Empire, sire.

Baked, not fried... the healthy choice.

No_Mercy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums
Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
Powered by vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2009 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios