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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this on the newbie thread, but figured I would have better luck with responses here.

Fighters cut weight to be at the highest strength/body weight ratio possible. That makes sense to me. What I don't get is why they cut for every fight. They'll cut 40 pounds for a fight, then put it back on right after.. and then cut again, etc.... I mean why not just keep it off? Wouldn't that be easier/just as effective? Wouldn't you retain just as much strength?

What do you think is the optimal body fat % to fight at without being too low?

How much straight water weight does a fighter usually cut right before a weigh in? Obviously too much would leave you dehydrated and weak.. but Im sure most do to some extent.. whats the 'general limit'do you think.

-I realize there is no exact answer.. everyone is different.. im just looking for some opinions/views.
 

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Roll Tide Roll
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Some fighters walk around 20 lbs heavy getting ready for a fight. Then they diet down to 10-15 lbs ish. Then cut the final water right before the fight then gain most of it back right after weigh-ins...This allows the fighter to be heavier going into the fight. Hopefully heavier than the guy they are fighting. And that = size advantage...sometimes......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wouldn't losing 10-15 pounds of water weight greatly hinder performance? even drinking tons of water immediately after weigh ins if its the same day I don't think there would be enough time for the body to fully recover from that.

I use to lose 8-9 pounds of water weight every night before a competition in highschool.. and Im pretty sure it messed me up (man I wish I could go back and fix that)
 

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Roll Tide Roll
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No you learn your limits....you really dont want to cut 15 lbs before but it is possible IF you are use to it....That being said 5-10 lbs seem to be the norm...I lose/gain 5 lbs on average every day when working out....A gallon of water weighs 8 lbs I think
 

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As the poster above me said, you learn your limits. It is much easier to cut 10-40lbs over the course of a month/few weeks than it is to maintain a very strict diet year around. Also, with the training these guys go through to prepare for a fight they would overtrain very quickly if they weren't eating right most of camp. (During a cut one certainly does not eat right)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't think losing weight would necessarily put you at risk for over training, as long as it was small (2-4 pounds a week, which I wouldn't really call a 'cut').

How much weight loss a week do you think would put you at risk for overtraining?
 

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Roll Tide Roll
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It depends man.....on how many calories you take in and burn....If you take in to little and you wont have the fuel to keep goin and your body needs it so it will get it else where (muscles)...you have to find balance
 

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'Man of Stone'
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Go to a personal trainer or sports nutrionist and have them calculate your base caloric burn. This will be the absolute minimum calories you should intake each day. Once you have this number you can calculate what your workouts consist of and pretty much everything you do. You need to absolutely stay no where under 20% of your daily burn rate. Especially training your body needs the nutrients still to build and repair muscles, keep your organs healthy and keep other nutrient levels correct.

There is almost an art to properly cutting weight and cutting your food intake. 90% of people who think they are fine cutting 20lbs fast before a fight and starving themselves are doing massive damage to their body.

If you are interested I can direct you toward some stuff for you to read up on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Absolutely, never hurts to read up on stuff. Im just trying to find that balance of cutting low enough to be as strong as possible while not hurting myself (as you said). Senior year wrestling I cut weight pretty poorly and it definately showed.
 

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Well I think that cutting fat is might be difficult, Try to eat less, if you want to cut your fat, drink one or two glasses of water before meals, this will make you feel more full and so you won't eat so much, and always try to do regular exercise, and also take proper diet while doing exercise, always go for a walk,
 

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I don't think losing weight would necessarily put you at risk for over training, as long as it was small (2-4 pounds a week, which I wouldn't really call a 'cut').

How much weight loss a week do you think would put you at risk for overtraining?
Sorry for my late response, my first response was if you were actually cutting for a fight or something. It was is very easy to get feelings similar to overtraining when you are cutting and still training. Did you wrestle in school or anything like that? Practices right before a tournament, for me and my teams at least, they were always much harder due to be hungry as hell and thirsty as hell and sore as hell. As G-Land has been (rightly so) preaching, you get to learn yourself and your limit and for me at least, that was when it became easy.

I dont know how much weight loss a week would lead to over training, in just about all things fitness related most things are very individualized, so you should find out what feels best/works best for you to reach your goals.
 

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Many people not involved in combative sports do not understand why anyone subject themselves to water and food restriction in the first place to cut weight. I usually explain it with examples of weight classes.The kickboxing legend was controversial weight class based on who cried foul in the game has never competed since.
 

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Go to a personal trainer or sports nutrionist and have them calculate your base caloric burn. This will be the absolute minimum calories you should intake each day. Once you have this number you can calculate what your workouts consist of and pretty much everything you do. You need to absolutely stay no where under 20% of your daily burn rate. Especially training your body needs the nutrients still to build and repair muscles, keep your organs healthy and keep other nutrient levels correct.

There is almost an art to properly cutting weight and cutting your food intake. 90% of people who think they are fine cutting 20lbs fast before a fight and starving themselves are doing massive damage to their body.

If you are interested I can direct you toward some stuff for you to read up on.
Can you send me the link?
 
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