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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone remember a fighter getting killed by a punch that lifted him up off the mat and was pronounced dead before he landed? i don't remember what kind of match this was but it was definatly UFC / Pride style fighting (MMA). This happened a while back and i don't even think it was in the USA. But im scrambling my brain to think where i saw this. Any help would be appreiated... Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
sorry ALSKI12 poor use of english. opps. Thanks cro.cop123....
 

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well thats what the rules and such are for. No one wants to see a fighter get seriously hurt otherwise you never get to see them fight again.. WIll it happen... More then likely yea it will.. Its inevitable in a sport like this.. It happens more often in boxing then people talk about espically at the amateure levels where bouts canbe very one side the ref and rign side docs not as compentent as those in the higher levels. but it does happen.. no one wants to see it happen.. but the chance is always there.. and for the record.. he was not dead on his feet he was still breathing before they went tomove him onto the streacher.. which for the record they did improperly there was no neck stabilazation AT ALL.. and I noticed it was right after that he seemed to no longer be breathing on his own..
 

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Ah well.. not too worried

I'm not too worried about this. This was a while back, I read the article, the guy was stupid. Besides, UFC rules are pretty much safer than PRIDE's, and I plan on staying in the UFC for most of my career. Plus, it can only get safer when in 10 years, y'know? As long as we can still grapple, submit, strike more than 5 punches, knock people out, I'm fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
brain damage.. i found this...

Thursday, March 19, 1998

Chipley man dies from injuries
suffered in 'ultimate fighting' match
Staff and Wire Reports

KIEV, Ukraine - A Washington County
man died Tuesday from injuries he sustained in a
bout of no-holds-barred "ultimate fighting" - a mix
of martial arts, wrestling and boxing - in Kiev,
Ukraine.
Douglas Dedge, 31, of Chipley, was hospitalized
Monday night after collapsing in the ring during the
Ukraine World Super Fight. He died of severe brain
injuries, said Petro Spasichenko, chief emergency
ward doctor at Kiev's Institute of Neurosurgery.
According to Danny Ray, a close friend who
attended the event, Dedge had taken a series of
punches to the head during the fight, which lasted
less than five minutes. He was still "defending
himself well" when the referee called the fight, but
Dedge collapsed a few seconds later and was not
breathing, Ray said.
"We consider his death a tragic accident that
disturbs us greatly," said Yuri Smetanin, one of the
bouts organizers. He is not the first competitor to
have died from injuries received during an ultimate
fighting bout.
Dedge was one of three U.S. fighters who took
part in the competition, which brought a large
crowd to a Kiev arena. The sport is popular in the
former Soviet Union, where it is called "Battle
Without Rules."
Dedge, who is survived by his wife Patricia and
five children, had founded a school to teach the
techniques of the sport called Reality Martial Arts
in Enterprise, Ala.
His mother, Shirley Dedge, could not remember
Wednesday how long he had been involved in the
sport. His wife was overseas.
"He was a loving husband and father, and he
participated in a lot of sports," Shirley Dedge said.
"It is the worst thing that ever happened to this
family."
Ultimate fighting has drawn fire in the United
States from critics who say it is too dangerous. It
has been banned in several states, but it remains a
lucrative commodity as many bouts are televised in
a pay-per-view format by cable service providers.
Video stores also carry some of the more famous
fights called "The Ultimate Fighting
Championships."
In the bouts, two fighters are put into a caged ring
and are allowed to strike and hold their opponents in
any manner they feel is appropriate. The only acts
outlawed are biting, poking opponents' eyes and
clawing.
The fights do not end until one of the fighters or
their managers gives up, or a referee ends the fight.
Usually the fights are in a tournament format
where the winner moves on to the next round and
the loser is out. Most championships consist of
eight competitors, but it varies depending on the
organizer.

News Herald reporter Kevin Porter
contributed to this report.
 
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