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UFC Quick Quote: Fighters are taxed 30 percent of purse when competing in Brazil
By Mike Bohn on Jan 26, 1:30p

According to UFC lightweight Gleison Tibau, UFC fighters are taxed 30 percent of their fight purse when competing in Brazil. The veteran 155-pound fighter has competed in the UFC 16 times over the course of his career and claims he declares his purses at the end of every year. But when he fought in Brazil for the first time under the UFC banner last October, Tibau says he was a victim of the "very heavy tax rate."



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Professionally, I liked to fight at UFC Brazil's, but financially, I found it absurd. Brazil charges many taxes of our purses, so I was unmotivated to fight in Brazil because of that. People pay taxes, I have no problem, but the money does not go to health, it does not produce benefit for the public. If it was a tax you paid, but you see the benefit, that's fine... The politics in Brazil is a very big robbery, that left me very sad. If I had fought in the United States, I always declare my purses at the end of the year. In Brazil, the check is already deducted, so is $50,000 that I no longer receive. It is a very heavy tax rate. I and other friends who fought in Brazil complained... We lose 30% of our purses."
-- Longtime Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) lightweight Gleison Tibau tells TATAME about the financial difficulties involved with competing in Brazil, revealing that the government deducts 30 percent of a fighter's purse for tax purposes. The 29-year-old fought in his first UFC bout in his home country last October, winning a unanimous decision over Francisco Trinaldo at UFC 153. He is next scheduled to face Evan Dunham at UFC 156 next month, which, much to Tibau's pleasure, takes place in Las Vegas, Nevada. The UFC has held five fight cards in Brazil since August 2011, which, considering 30 percent is a significant portion of a fighter's purse, makes it all the more interesting that Tibau is the first to reveal this nugget of news. With the UFC adding more and more dates in Brazil to their calendar every year, it will be interesting to see if fighters attempt to avoid being scheduled on fight cards in the country due to the heavy tax.



http://www.mmamania.com/2013/1/26/3...brazilian-fighters-get-taxed-30-of-purse-when
 

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UFC Quick Quote: Fighters are taxed 30 percent of purse when competing in Brazil
By Mike Bohn on Jan 26, 1:30p

According to UFC lightweight Gleison Tibau, UFC fighters are taxed 30 percent of their fight purse when competing in Brazil. The veteran 155-pound fighter has competed in the UFC 16 times over the course of his career and claims he declares his purses at the end of every year. But when he fought in Brazil for the first time under the UFC banner last October, Tibau says he was a victim of the "very heavy tax rate."



"

-- Longtime Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) lightweight Gleison Tibau tells TATAME about the financial difficulties involved with competing in Brazil, revealing that the government deducts 30 percent of a fighter's purse for tax purposes. The 29-year-old fought in his first UFC bout in his home country last October, winning a unanimous decision over Francisco Trinaldo at UFC 153. He is next scheduled to face Evan Dunham at UFC 156 next month, which, much to Tibau's pleasure, takes place in Las Vegas, Nevada. The UFC has held five fight cards in Brazil since August 2011, which, considering 30 percent is a significant portion of a fighter's purse, makes it all the more interesting that Tibau is the first to reveal this nugget of news. With the UFC adding more and more dates in Brazil to their calendar every year, it will be interesting to see if fighters attempt to avoid being scheduled on fight cards in the country due to the heavy tax.



http://www.mmamania.com/2013/1/26/3...brazilian-fighters-get-taxed-30-of-purse-when
I can't argue with the guy their... That's just wrong.
 

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All Eyez on Me
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Apparently Paquiao doesn't won't to fight in America as much anymore because of the same reason.

But these guys don't get paid nearly as much so it's much worse.
Pacquiao doesn't want to live or train in America but wants to fight there. It's where all the money is but also were all the regulations and infrastructure is ,that has allowed him to earn millions of dollars for swinging his fist.
 

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The Mad Titan
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Pacquiao doesn't want to live or train in America but wants to fight there. It's where all the money is but also were all the regulations and infrastructure is ,that has allowed him to earn millions of dollars for swinging his fist.

http://espndeportes.espn.go.com/news/story?id=1707800&s=box&type=story

translated
Manny Pacquiao doesn't want to fight in the U.S. again do to high taxes that apply to his earnings said Arum.

The multi division champion has fought nearly half his 61 fights in the U.S. and majority since 2001, including his devastating KO against JMM this past December in Las Vegas.

Without hesitation, the talk about a potential 5th fight with the Mexican in April, Arum ruled out the return of the Filipino to the U.S. with Macau and Singapore being alternate sites for a combat event.

"He doesn't want to fight in the U.S. Why? Because he has to pay close to 40% to the government". Said Arum.

"It's closing in on the ridiculous, continued Arum. "In what concerns Manny and also Marquez, they prefer not to fight in the U.S."

"This is what happens when you raise taxes, and you say "good let the rich pay", and for that reason the boxers fall into a category that classifies them as rich.
It was sufficient paying 35%, and now pay 40%, enough is enough. The great foreign boxers don't want to fight in the U.S." Said Arum
 

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All Eyez on Me
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My original point is if he didn't want to fight in the US he wouldn't be fighting there. He's the headliner of all his fights and fighting in the US puts him ahead financially regardless of taxes. America funds him, Who else pays $50-$70 for PPV's or hundreds to thousands of dollars for tickets year round?

He's not an American so other than the huge fan base i.e (money) he doesn't have any reason to be here. The fact that he's here means that he's cashing in more than he would elsewhere. When he moves his fights to the Phillipines or Macau then I'll believe otherwise.

Also that article sounds like Arum trying to make a political point and using Pacquiao.
 

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Cruz Control
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Apparently Paquiao doesn't won't to fight in America as much anymore because of the same reason.

But these guys don't get paid nearly as much so it's much worse.
Pacquiao should have stopped running from Floyd and got his big payday then before Marquez made him eat the canvas at the MGM Grand.

There's no shame in losing to boxing royalty.
 

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