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Which style?

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  • Other (explain)

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so pretend you had a strong background in one of the mentioned disciplines. You have trained seven years in any of those that you choose and then had exactly one year to train MMA before you got into your first MMA fight. Assume you trained with the top coaches of any of the disciplines, (i.e. wrestling: Dan gable, maybe roach for boxing you get the idea).

Which of the mentioned disciplines would you choose to ensure the best odds of being successful in MMA?

I apologize if I forgot any.
 

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Ok, so pretend you had a strong background in one of the mentioned disciplines. You have trained seven years in any of those that you choose and then had exactly one year to train MMA before you got into your first MMA fight. Assume you trained with the top coaches of any of the disciplines, (i.e. wrestling: Dan gable, maybe roach for boxing you get the idea).

Which of the mentioned disciplines would you choose to ensure the best odds of being successful in MMA?

I apologize if I forgot any.
I think wrestling is very important, but just taking a guy down and lying on him isn't going to ensure victory, you need to couple it with something else, muay thai jujitsu to have a big threat and be able to stop the fight, or know what to do to defend submissions as its ok taking a guy down, then what can you do when your there if he threatens with subs?
You are definitely going to be taken down at some point yourself, so it's important to know something on the ground, as 80% of people can throw a half decent punch/kick etc, not only that if you are facing a good striker the easiest thing is to take him down and sub him, although I love my Muay Thai, I have to pick JIU-JITSU.
 

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gotta be free/folkstyle wrestling. You hear it all the time: wrestlers dictate where the fight goes. The fact is, you CAN take a guy down and just lay on him to win a fight with the current rule set. Right now there really is no answer to a good wrestler with a basic knowledge of submissions and decent striking. Even if someone were to implement this plan now, in eight years, I still see wrestlers being at or near the top of each division
 

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"Focus"
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Any kind of wrestling, great strikers with sick KO power and great TDD don't happen with a year under your belt. Wrestlers can win fights with just wrestling, as we've seen happen time and time again.
 

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Tai Chi (surprisingly), MMA is not just about the physical aspect, it is about discipline and motivation as well. I think that a fighter that can use momentum and body motion is better off than a fighter that is a grappler or a striker. I think with the basics down of one martial arts the others are easy to pick up in the over lap.

Otherwise, I think Judo is superior to wresting as it is about surprise, quickness and balance rather than power.

And to round the fighter off, I think that a fighter should be well versed in krav maga and savate.
 

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MMA Patriot
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Jkd no doubt. Because of the movies many people don't realize Bruce was pretty much the founder of the Idea of mma. JKD is not really a style it is mma. Bruce wasn't just a movie star. Although you see him use mostly Kung Fu and the tkd side kick in the movies in real life he intigrated tkd wrestleing judo karate boxingand bjj into his fighting style. I have always wanted to train in it but cand find anyone who teaches it.
 

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Under the limits you are imposing, wrestling, no question. It should be abundantly clear that if you are going to be one-dimensional in MMA, wrestling is the dimension you want. If you put a one dimensional wrestler against a one dimensional striker, or basically anything else with a limited skill set, the wrestler wins almost every time. There are many facets to MMA, but the ability to control where a fight takes place, and to control your opponent on the ground, are huge and IMO more important than any other single aspect.
 

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Under the limits you are imposing, wrestling, no question. It should be abundantly clear that if you are going to be one-dimensional in MMA, wrestling is the dimension you want. If you put a one dimensional wrestler against a one dimensional striker, or basically anything else with a limited skill set, the wrestler wins almost every time. There are many facets to MMA, but the ability to control where a fight takes place, and to control your opponent on the ground, are huge and IMO more important than any other single aspect.
This was proven in the early UFC days
 

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Well, I've been training in Judo for over a year now so I'll go with that and not just out of loyalty.

I think it's a really strong martial art for a number of reasons. First, you get to do loads of randori/sparring so you're not just standing there shadow boxing or working a bag: you're actually fighting dozens of times a night. Also you learn how to control people on the ground as well as learning some good arm locks and chokes. The only real problem (apart from the lack of striking) is the fact that they've pretty much removed leg grabs from Judo which really limits your takedowns if you're fighting no gi and, therefore, limits your takedown defence.
 
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