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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. My name is Rob, Im 20 years old going on 21 in a couple months. My whole life Ive been an athlete, unfortunately my whole life Ive dealt with constant injuries. The most recent of which was a herniated disk in my lower back about 3 months ago...but thats starting to heal and I will hopefully be getting an injection soon...but anyway Im not gonna get into all that. Im not new to rehab nor am i new to the gym so Im not overly worried there. What Im worried about is where to start with fighting. The past few years Ive been more and more interested in MMA training, I just never started up because I was busy with other sports, but as Im halfway through college now and the hopes of playing college football for a D1 school have all but died out, Im looking to change my direction once Im healthy again.

Im 6'2", about 240 currently. Just started hitting the weights again a week and a half ago.

I have ZERO fighting experience. No boxing, no martial arts, nothing. I am going to start training BJJ within the coming weeks, and most likely joining a Taekwando club at my school in the following spring semester (not this fall). Id rather it not come down to TKD but thats what there is and I see it as better than nothing. Id say about the only thing I know how to do is maybe throw a good punch (my father taught me that much, he used to box and was a black belt in Japanese Jiu Jitsu).

Tomorrow I'll be picking up a punching bag (which I wanted anyway lol) and Im gonna start pounding on that..but I guess what Im really getting to is, where the hell do I start when Im starting from zero? lol thanks for any advice guys.
 

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dude just train in bjj like twice a week and eat lean and well and often, youll pick it up in no time and become obsessed, but you definatly want to try get to a muay thai or kick boxing class every one and a while, as tdk kicking and punching usualy isnt taught as practical punching, and their techniques tend to leave you open and off balance to takedowns and theres other issues... kick boxing is an essencial so you should atlease attend a couple of classes somewhere... also bjj will get you in awsome shape cos my submission fighting club has great conditioning (well its actually vale tudo which is like bjj witth alot of thai boxing)... but good look (also pick up a tub of whey protein for recovery shakes haha) :)
 

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'Man of Stone'
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dude just train in bjj like twice a week and eat lean and well and often, youll pick it up in no time and become obsessed, but you definatly want to try get to a muay thai or kick boxing class every one and a while, as tdk kicking and punching usualy isnt taught as practical punching, and their techniques tend to leave you open and off balance to takedowns and theres other issues... kick boxing is an essencial so you should atlease attend a couple of classes somewhere... also bjj will get you in awsome shape cos my submission fighting club has great conditioning (well its actually vale tudo which is like bjj witth alot of thai boxing)... but good look (also pick up a tub of whey protein for recovery shakes haha) :)
About half of this is wrong, possibly more.

Anyways for stand up TKD is honestly a good initial option to learn how to throw punches and kicks and get you started in the right direction for conditioning. If you can get boxing or muay thai also that will be a lot more beneficial but the largest mix you can get the better. TKD will start you out with elementary punching and will take what they teach you at the start and turn that into a combat effective punch. The purpose of not teaching you a combat effective punch in the very start is so your body gets trained to shift weight and move properly before full executing the punch. As with most stand up martial arts they will start out teaching you to throw your punches from from your hips to get it ingrained in your head to twist your arms and shift your body weight appropriately. The same more or less applies to how kicks are taught in TKD and Karate.

As for your ground game BJJ and Judo would be your best bet unless you can get in contact with a local college wrestling coach for some good wrestling fundamentals.

Gym and workout wise focus on conditioning, endurance and explosive training over strength until your cardio and muscle endurance hits a decent level. You DO NOT want to hit heavy weights and keep things at a slow pace as it will keep muscle reaction time low and your muscles will be a lot stiffer. This is a very common problem with power lifters and body builders.

Look at programs like Crossfit or P90X for a good basis for conditioning also.

As diet is concerned stick with high protein, high fiber and low carbs and fat. High carbs are alright for one meal a day and should be either breakfast or lunch. Stick with 6-8 meals/snacks a day and a few of those should be basic protein shakes or whole foods. Pushing your body to a new athletic level and training for MMA you will feel a lot better eating clean and non processed foods also not to mention your body will process and break down the nutrients a lot faster.

If you have any questions feel free to ask and if you would like send me a PM with your current workout program, what martial arts schools/classes are available etc and I will help you put together something optimal for training and obtaining your goals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
About half of this is wrong, possibly more.

Anyways for stand up TKD is honestly a good initial option to learn how to throw punches and kicks and get you started in the right direction for conditioning. If you can get boxing or muay thai also that will be a lot more beneficial but the largest mix you can get the better. TKD will start you out with elementary punching and will take what they teach you at the start and turn that into a combat effective punch. The purpose of not teaching you a combat effective punch in the very start is so your body gets trained to shift weight and move properly before full executing the punch. As with most stand up martial arts they will start out teaching you to throw your punches from from your hips to get it ingrained in your head to twist your arms and shift your body weight appropriately. The same more or less applies to how kicks are taught in TKD and Karate.

As for your ground game BJJ and Judo would be your best bet unless you can get in contact with a local college wrestling coach for some good wrestling fundamentals.

Gym and workout wise focus on conditioning, endurance and explosive training over strength until your cardio and muscle endurance hits a decent level. You DO NOT want to hit heavy weights and keep things at a slow pace as it will keep muscle reaction time low and your muscles will be a lot stiffer. This is a very common problem with power lifters and body builders.

Look at programs like Crossfit or P90X for a good basis for conditioning also.

As diet is concerned stick with high protein, high fiber and low carbs and fat. High carbs are alright for one meal a day and should be either breakfast or lunch. Stick with 6-8 meals/snacks a day and a few of those should be basic protein shakes or whole foods. Pushing your body to a new athletic level and training for MMA you will feel a lot better eating clean and non processed foods also not to mention your body will process and break down the nutrients a lot faster.

If you have any questions feel free to ask and if you would like send me a PM with your current workout program, what martial arts schools/classes are available etc and I will help you put together something optimal for training and obtaining your goals.

TYVM for an informative post! I am waiting on a doctor appointment this friday to hear about a herniated disk and then I am going to determine from there how long from now I can start training. Ive been hitting the gym again FINALLY and my back feels fantastic but still an obvious herniation, so BJJ training will be down the road a bit still, but the plan as it stands right now will be to start BJJ asap, followed about a month or two further down the road from that, by a Muay Thai class that is apparently at the same school, lol I didnt know that before...

As for my current workout, Ive been very into weight training for a few years now, and I wont say Im an expert but I do believe I have that in order. Currently doing an Iso split to tone out a bit for the progress I lost since the herniation. Unfortunately my diet still isnt quite in check yet, but Im working on that lol.

I'll post back again friday after the appointment to update on what my doctor thinks, but in my opinion with the way im progressing currently, and even doing lower back targeting exercises, id say within a couple months I should be good to go, but Im certainly not going to push it. This was a TERRIBLE injury.
 

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'Man of Stone'
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As for the weight training you really need to focus on olympic lifts and full body workouts... It's pretty crucial to get away from muscle group focusing as your body needs to get used to using everything at once. Check out my training log for a good example of MMA conditioning workouts and lifting programs. Even for the strength days and going "heavy" the pace is kept fairly fast and the heart rate high. Every once in a while, maybe once a month should you hit the weights really heavy and go for a low rep 4-6 reps per lift strength day.
 

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what the hell, there was nothing wrong about what I said... Ofcourse kick boxing/muay thai is better for mma than tkd... tkd puts you off balance to take downs as it is a striking art, I did tkd until I was 16 and became brown belt! I just simpled things up for him in that post as he said he was new, and you dont jump right into heavy training when you start as it can put people off, if they start just attending a couple of classes a week in no time theyr hooked and train at their limit.
 
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