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· Outta My Head
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If I remember correctly, PP attacks are not allowed in MMA. However, due to their nature, they are at best (as DAT stated) a hit-or-miss weapon under actual combat applications. I would actually think that you would have a much larger chance of winning the lottery than being able to use PP attacks with reliable results in an actual fight; especially against someone who is trained.

Case in point: One thing that I sadistically do to get someone's arm off of me (if they are the average Joe) is shooting a spear hand up into a person's armpit. Usually you can catch a person off guard and cause a consistent enough amount of pain to make them recoil quickly. When I used to roll with one of my associates from my brother's church, I found myself mounted and in the midst of trying to bridge/upa out of it I snuck the spear into place. After the intitial flinch, I had the same arm I used snatched from its safe haven and barred viciously.

The same guy told me about how to get into someone's nerves just enough to make them move to escape, but warned about how in an actual fight it would be a lot better trying to tie up the person on top and sweeping them because it doesn't do me any good to fish for nerve clusters if my head is being bounced off of the canvas from punches. Further, through rolling on a regular basis, if your opponent is conscious enough to fight you for control of your arms, head, or legs (which they will do whether they are skilled or not) it becomes too much of an issue to look for a fine pressure-point area regardless if you're in a good position or not.
 

· Outta My Head
Joined
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1,259 Posts
Paw said:
Haha a 1 in 13 million chance in winning the lottery. What I was saying you may not be aiming to hit them, you may just be wanting to hit them as hard as you can in the head but people still hit them and knock their opponent out with out any knowledge of pressurepoint attacks.
If you notice, the operative words of my argument were "being able to use PP attacks with reliable results in an actual fight; especially against someone who is trained." Even then, I can safely bet due to my rudimentary knowledge of human physiology, that even if a man were to have the majority his facial nerves paralyzed he would still get knocked out from being hit in the head hard enough. There is still the ability to shock the brain inside of skull violently enough to have it mash into one side of their cranium (just like any concussion) and that will knock someone out regardless of the operative nerves just under the 2nd layer of their skin.

You also have to realize that a lot of PP theory and technique falls under the extremely old-school philosophy of training striking arts. This was developed either under 1 or 2-step katas or drills where a set willing partner would attack, and they practitioner would counter and finish the technique with no resistance being given at all. Neither was the technique ever trained to be fully completed (an ear mark of many traditional Martial Arts) because of fear of maiming or killing their training partner. Because of that, the person training in such arts would be completely at a handicap when actually facing a trained and experienced fighter. It's the same reason why many point-tournament competitors who enjoy large amounts of success are abysmal at full-contact or freestyle competitions. The reason being is that all fights continue chaotically past every initial set of techniques, unless they are lucky or good enough to KO their opponent 100% in each and every fight; which we all know is impossible anyways.
 
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