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How can you not love the guy? Seriously?

http://www.ufc.com/index.cfm?fa=news.detail&gid=81605

By Thomas Gerbasi

One of the most cerebral fighters in MMA today, Rashad Evans is also one of the most interesting. So an interview with the former light heavyweight champion won’t consist of the usual sports world clichés, but answers that go deep into the psyche of a fighter before the biggest nights of his life.

With just a little over two weeks to go before his highly-anticipated showdown with Rampage Jackson in the main event of UFC 114 on May 29th, let’s hear what Mr. Evans has had to say over the course of his UFC career…

WHY FIGHTING?
“I just really love to fight. I’ve always been a fighter, but I fell in love with the sport after I graduated from college. I met some guys who were doing it, and ever since then I’ve been in love with it.”

WINNING THE ULTIMATE FIGHTER 2
“I surprised a lot of people, including (UFC President) Dana White. A lot of people thought that I didn’t have any talent at all. See, I always had confidence in myself, but the better I did, people would say ‘wow’ and they just couldn’t believe it. I knew my own potential, but they didn’t know, so it was a big surprise to them.”

EMBRACING THE SUFFERING
“My mindset is, I’m gonna try to go where my opponent doesn’t want to go – we’ll see who can suffer the longest. That’s basically it, and if he can outlast me in suffering, then he wins the fight. But it’s a mindset to drive yourself to suffer. My wrestling coaches used to call it mental toughness. They would dog us out in practice and make us do things that we possibly couldn’t do, but they made us feel like we had to do it. They’d say ‘mental toughness, mental toughness’ and you learn to like the suffering - you learn to welcome that feeling when it comes. A lot of people run from it because they want to start feeling okay again, but when you embrace the suffering, you just ride it out, and pretty soon, you’ve outlasted your opponent.”

DON’T SLEEP ON “SUGA”
“I definitely think people sleep on me. They don’t quite understand how I do the things that I do – some people respect it, but they don’t understand it. They say, ‘I don’t see how this kid can win, I don’t see what he does that people haven’t beat him yet.’ And they’ve counted me out many times, and they continue to sleep on me. I don’t know what I have to do to break out of it, but I’m not gonna worry about it anymore. I’m just gonna do me and just let my work speak for itself.”

ON BEING A ROLE MODEL
“I’m very comfortable with the fact that I bring an African-American face to the UFC. It’s excellent if black kids, or any kids for that matter, see me and are inspired by what I do. I’m very excited to be a good representative for black people and a good role model in general. I enjoy it because I know it’s not gonna be around forever and who knows how long it can last. I know everybody doesn’t always have this chance to experience this, so I feel like I’m experiencing a once in a lifetime thing and I’m just enjoying it as long as I can.”

ON RESPECT
“I think it’s kinda messed up that sometimes I’m just passed over, but that’s what I call soul food. It’s food for my soul and it helps me grow to be stronger than I normally would if everyone else had been behind me the whole time. But I definitely believe that if I keep going in there and showing people what’s inside of me – what I can do and what I’m capable of doing – it will definitely let them say ‘wow, I was wrong about him.’”

ON LOSING
“To lose is a very humbling experience. You’ve got to break yourself back down to see what happened, and ultimately you just try to move forward. When I was younger I would cry and get upset, but as I got older and matured, I understood what it meant to lose and I got a better handle on it. I said ‘okay, I lost, this is why I lost, and I’m never gonna let that happen again.’”

FIGHTING ADVERSITY
“Sometimes when you’re down in a fight, you just gotta say ‘I’m gonna go for broke and whatever happens happens. If he’s able to withstand this or dominate me in any fashion, then he’s the better man this night.’ But you know what, he’s gonna feel me. That’s my biggest thing; when I’m down and out, he’s gonna feel me. And then from there it just comes together.”

HIS REASONING FOR TAKING THE LIDDELL BOUT
“I’ve always said that I wanted to be the best and that I wanted to leave my mark in this sport. The only way you can do that is by facing the best. I’m not a fighter who wants to fill himself with false hope that I’m something that I’m not. I think I’m the best, so I’m gonna go out there, fight the best, and test myself.”

ON FIGHTING AND BEATING LIDDELL
“There was no pressure to take him down. I was confident enough in my standup that we could go blow for blow and I was not gonna be afraid to take a hit from him and just do it. You hear people talk about his punching power, and you try not to let it really resonate in your mind because the last thing you want to be doing is going out there afraid of your opponent’s punch. Then you’ll be fighting a scared fight.”

ON THE SHOT HEARD ‘ROUND THE MMA WORLD
“My intention when I threw the punch was to throw it as fast as I can. And I threw it, it went through, and I was gonna follow up with the left hook, but he was already going down. And after the left hook went by, I was like ‘oh no, he fell down. I’ve gotta hurry up and finish him.’ But it seemed like it took forever for me to come out of that left hook to turn around and get on him. It was so quiet in there, I could hear a pin drop. The fight was over, Herb Dean had stopped it, and I was in shock because everybody was so quiet.”

POST-LIDDELL
“I’m definitely able to enjoy the moment, and everybody’s so excited about it, but I try not to live in the moment. I don’t want this to be the only thing I’ve ever done when it comes to my career. I want this to be the beginning stage, where people start to really see my capabilities. I’m trying to walk a fine line – yeah, I enjoyed it and it was a good experience, but I’m not truly satisfied, because satisfaction is something you get once you’re ready to be done because you have fulfillment. If you don’t have that fulfillment, you’re always able to go on and reach new heights. And that’s what I want to do.”

ON HIS TITLE SHOT
“It feels like it was a long journey, but it’s a wonderful thing and it feels great. I can’t go ahead and make it too big of a thing though. It has to be just another fight for me. And that’s how I’m gonna approach it. I’d love to be a title holder, and whether I go out there and win this time or not, I’m gonna be a title holder. It’s a matter of not putting too much pressure on myself, enjoying the moment, and going out there and trying to have fun with it.”

ON WINNING THE BELT
“Even when I won the belt, it was a strange feeling because I thought that I would have that euphoric feeling – like you see people dropping to the ground and crying, they’re so super excited, and I didn’t feel that. It was strange and I’m kinda disappointed because I didn’t genuinely feel like that. It just felt like another fight. I’m very proud that I’ve achieved what I have, but at the same time, I didn’t feel anything different. I thought that by winning the belt I’d have super powers or something. (Laughs) But nothing happened – I didn’t gain any special knowledge or anything.”

ON GETTING THROUGH THE TOUGH FIGHTS
“In my mind, I say ‘there’s no way that I’m losing this fight. No matter how bad I’m feeling, I’m just thinking the whole time that I’m in a fight and getting pushed that ‘I’m not losing, I’m not losing.’ I just say that over and over to myself. When things are getting hard or I’m fading out, I just say that and it works out.”

THE FINE LINE BETWEEN THINKING AND ACTING
“There is a fine line and you can’t be all in your head. You can’t be so in your head that you’re thinking ‘oh, what if this don’t happen, what if this happens?’ You have to let go and relax enough to take some chances. When you’re so much in your head that you’re worried about winning and losing, you don’t pull the trigger sometimes when you should because you’re thinking ‘well, what if I get caught?’”

ON LIFE AS THE UNDERDOG
“I always keep in my mindset, no matter what, that I am the underdog. And being the underdog comes more from a training perspective than as how others view you, because if you train as if you are the underdog, then you’re doing the little things. You’re doing the stuff when you don’t feel like doing it and that’s what being the underdog really means. Because when somebody says you’re the underdog, it’s more a motivational factor to say ‘oh yeah? I’m gonna show them. Let me go do this extra work or make sure I do this a little bit better.’ As long as you take that mentality of doing that extra work or doing the things that you feel that you need to get to that next level, then I think you can still fight from that position.”

IF THIS IS THE END…
“In this game, you’re always one fight away from your last fight. Each and every time I go to training camp, I train as if it’s my last fight because one of these times it very well may be, and who knows if this is gonna be the last time. So I enjoy myself the whole way.”

ON THE FANS’ MISCONCEPTIONS
I think sometimes that once the fans have their mind made up about you, that’s it, and I think a lot of it comes from that Matt Hughes thing (during season two of The Ultimate Fighter), where he said I was cocky and that I like to showboat, and I think that stigma has followed me. No matter what I do, they see my personality as concrete, and there’s no changing it for a lot of people. A lot of people are very lazy with their opinions, and once their mind is made up one way, they either refuse or it’s very hard for them to go another way. But I take the good with the bad, and the good thing is this – I’ve never met a fan that didn’t like me.”

THE ULTIMATE GOAL
“I want fans to get that feeling you get when you’re on the edge of your seat, you can’t quite get up, and you’ve got the butterflies in your stomach, and you’re not even out there. I want them to feel that, I want them to feel the passion from watching me fight. That’s the most exciting thing I think we, as fighters, or anybody in the entertainment industry, can give to the fans. That feeling that they are there.”
 

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How can I not love this guy?Because he's a total douchebag prick , he thinks hes above and beyond better than anyone in his division and on top of that acts far to cocky in the cage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How can I not love this guy?Because he's a total douchebag prick , he thinks hes above and beyond better than anyone in his division and on top of that acts far to cocky in the cage.
Did you even read any of the article?
 

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:thumbsup: Rashad is one of the best interviewees in the sport. Always love hearing what the guy has to say. Great point he makes about the Matt Hughes thing. I just can't wrap my head around why such a large portion of the fanbase still has such an irrational, dire hatred for Rashad Evans.

Don't need to, we all know what he does in the right and the way he acts about himself.
I do believe he specifically mentions you in the article ;).
 

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I agree Rashad can get a little cocky but I think he is quite a respectable person, everyone's got their dislikes and likes towards a fighter and mainly for Rashad it's because he talks a lot of shit and acts like he doesn't lol however you gotta look at the whole character before you judge because I've seen some great respect come from Rashad, dudes cocky but he will give credit where its due such as when he lost his title, whens the last time you saw some one get beat for the first time and knocked out, but still take the short interview with Joe Rogan and give props to the winner? most would be too upset to even stay in the cage for too long.
 

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ehh, Ill go out on a limb and say it:

I think part of the reason Rashad gets alot of hate is because he is a confident Black man who is unbending about his personality. He doesnt have the animated theatrics of a Rampage or Krazy Horse, and is isnt a super humble/ super quiet man like Jon Jones or Phil Davis...and lets be honest, that angers alot of people and also turns them off as potential fans. I think this is where alot of the "cockiness" accusations come from.

I remember seeing a Yahoo sports article interview after he KO'ed Chuck, he said the first thing (and most obvious) thing people did was attack his ethnicity (just check Sherdog and Youtube for other examples of this)...others even went to far as to say he was "unsportsmanlike" for not "controlling his wife (Toya Evans)" and
not showing concern for a downed Liddell. Too bad the link is gone.

Now I know I am one of the few people on this forum of African descent, and I am aware my views/opinions will be different that those on this forum whom are not of African descent (may even be the case for those who are)...so let it be known, I am not playing a "race card". Im simply stating that race does play a factor in the negative assumptions/opinions of Rashad Evans...as we live in America, and its foolish to be dismissive and pretend its not an issue.

My 0.02$.
 

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I never understood alot of the Rashad hate. For the record I like both Rashad and Rampage but Rampage is 10x the douce Rashad is.
Im not gonna go as far as calling Rampage a douche ( Lord, I hate that word) but I will say its interesting how much love Rampage gets compared to Rashad....seeing as though Rampage has been caught on camera sexually harassing women and hit a woman causing the stillbirth of her unborn baby

Funny because I also hear about how much of a "douch" Matt Hughes and seen excerpts of his book...yet I notice most MMA fans does have the intense anger towards Hughes like that of Rashad. Just things I notice.
 

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ehh, Ill go out on a limb and say it:

I think part of the reason Rashad gets alot of hate is because he is a confident Black man who is unbending about his personality. He doesnt have the animated theatrics of a Rampage or Krazy Horse, and is isnt a super humble/ super quiet man like Jon Jones or Phil Davis...and lets be honest, that angers alot of people and also turns them off as potential fans. I think this is where alot of the "cockiness" accusations come from.

I remember seeing a Yahoo sports article interview after he KO'ed Chuck, he said the first thing (and most obvious) thing people did was attack his ethnicity (just check Sherdog and Youtube for other examples of this)...others even went to far as to say he was "unsportsmanlike" for not "controlling his wife (Toya Evans)" and
not showing concern for a downed Liddell. Too bad the link is gone.

Now I know I am one of the few people on this forum of African descent, and I am aware my views/opinions will be different that those on this forum whom are not of African descent (may even be the case for those who are)...so let it be known, I am not playing a "race card". Im simply stating that race does play a factor in the negative assumptions/opinions of Rashad Evans...as we live in America, and its foolish to be dismissive and pretend its not an issue.

My 0.02$.
THIS. Could not have said it better myself. In fact, I think I may have said something somewhat similar in an older thread, but yeah, you pretty much hit the nail on the head.

I understand that segregation is not very uncommon in the USA, even today, and that most non blacks have a fixed view on how a black person should act. Rampage acts how a middle class non black person would expect of him, hence why a lot of white people love Rampage. They associate that type of exuberant and laddish behaviour with black men. Whereas Rashad is completely different even though he knows he 'ghetto lingo'. Rashad is a HIGHLY intelligent black man and doesn't seem to pertain to the stereotypical views ignorant people have of him, which I imagine frustrates people the most.

So yeah, what Sekou said :thumb02:
 

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Are we seriously playing the race card with respect for why people don't like Rashad Evans? Is that the only possible reason? I'm white and I don't like him. Does that make me a racist?

Ultimately, no. Race has little - if anything - to do with why he isn't well loved. Most people dislike him because of the cocky little things he does in the ring. He seems intelligent and humble in the interviews but most will only see his actions in the ring.

Just because a black fighter is disliked doesn't make it racism. Pulling that card is a bit premature. Definitely if you are basing it off what random idiots on Youtube or Sherdog say.
 

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ehh, Ill go out on a limb and say it:

I think part of the reason Rashad gets alot of hate is because he is a confident Black man who is unbending about his personality. He doesnt have the animated theatrics of a Rampage or Krazy Horse, and is isnt a super humble/ super quiet man like Jon Jones or Phil Davis...and lets be honest, that angers alot of people and also turns them off as potential fans. I think this is where alot of the "cockiness" accusations come from.

I remember seeing a Yahoo sports article interview after he KO'ed Chuck, he said the first thing (and most obvious) thing people did was attack his ethnicity (just check Sherdog and Youtube for other examples of this)...others even went to far as to say he was "unsportsmanlike" for not "controlling his wife (Toya Evans)" and
not showing concern for a downed Liddell. Too bad the link is gone.

Now I know I am one of the few people on this forum of African descent, and I am aware my views/opinions will be different that those on this forum whom are not of African descent (may even be the case for those who are)...so let it be known, I am not playing a "race card". Im simply stating that race does play a factor in the negative assumptions/opinions of Rashad Evans...as we live in America, and its foolish to be dismissive and pretend its not an issue.

My 0.02$.
For some people that may be true, but I don't like him because there is a fine line between Cocky and Confident.

Frank Mir is Confident and probably on the Cocky side, but when he gets in the cage he's all business. He's one of my favorite fighters. Same with Jon Jones and Ben Saunders.

Nick and Nate Diaz are both Cocky inside and outside the ring and I ******* HATE them for it.

Rashad is Confident outside the cage and he's cocky IN it (grabbing his nuts at Forrest etc).

There's no line for race in there really. It's more of a matter of respect for the sport and Martial Arts. I mean, this may be Mixed Martial Arts but it is STILL a Martial Art and respect should always be found in the cage. Always. People like Rashad and the Diaz' show an amount of disrespect to their opponents and to the sport when they try to pull antics like that and I feel it has no place in the sport. It has nothing to do with the fact that he's black and he's doing it, it's just that he's doing it at all.
 

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Are we seriously playing the race card with respect for why people don't like Rashad Evans? Is that the only possible reason? I'm white and I don't like him. Does that make me a racist?

Ultimately, no. Race has little - if anything - to do with why he isn't well loved. Most people dislike him because of the cocky little things he does in the ring. He seems intelligent and humble in the interviews but most will only see his actions in the ring.

Just because a black fighter is disliked doesn't make it racism. Pulling that card is a bit premature. Definitely if you are basing it off what random idiots on Youtube or Sherdog say.


no offense, brethren.....but it would be wise for you to read my former post from an intellectual head rather than just fonting about "racism racism racism"


another thing...where do these "cockiness" accusations come from"" Was it saying Machida hands felt like pillows? Was it saying that Chuck would "get is ass knocked out?" If thats the case,I guess every fighter should be a super humble, super nice guy, who thinks his opponents are "top tier fighters" whom he respects 24-7.

But thats not reality.
 
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