Mixed Martial Arts Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all... In this particular thread I (and anyone else who wishes to contribute) will be posting links to videos, pictures or other type of media on various submission. I'll break down how they work, and (if available) provide instructional media. Whether you want to look at all the different ways you can get someone to tap, or just to chime in, don't be afraid to contribute.

First up:

The Twister:

Vid (in action)
Vid (Instructional)

Okay, if you've read any sort of excerpt from any of the odd postsings of Eddie Bravo, you'll swear that this has got to be the end-all/be-all of submissions. I was rather suprised that it is really just an Amateur Wrestler's Guillotine (not to be confused with the BJJ Guillotine). However, spinal and neck cranks are not allowed in amateur wrestling, but the single-leg ride with a power-half on the opposite side is a very common occurence.

The Twister is mainly a Neck Crank, compressing the cervical vertebrae and twisting them to point of hyper-rotation. Depending on the arch of the person's body while in position (and also how flexible they are), you can also put submission pressure on the persons spine, knee, abdominals and other portions of their upper torso. Yeah, I know it looks like a lying version of the Pro Wrestling Abdominal Stretch/Cobra Twist. However, due to the position that a person will be in during it's PW variant, no actual stretching occurs.

More to come as the night goes by...
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The Gogoplata

Hello all. Here is the second addition to our submission showcase. It is the Gogoplata.

Vid Here

The Gogoplata is an alternative submission when going for an Omoplata. In this case, the trapping/submitting leg already is in position for the Omoplata, however the opponent on top is conscious of it and keeps adjusting with the person on the bottom to keep them from scooting their hips out completely, which prevents them from turning out from under the opponent and finishing the hold.

In this case, if the person going for the omoplata is flexible enough, and the opponent on top exposes their neck, they can secure the Gogoplata by slipping the shin and foot of their submitting leg under the chin of the top opponent. From there, their other leg would come up over the top of the opponent's head and secure itself behind their neck. The bottom man would then grabb the foot of the top leg (securing it) and would secure the choke by extending the bottom leg upwards, while levering the top leg downwards with their arms. This could result in either a carotid choke (notice the triangle formed by the bottom mans bottom leg/foot, top leg and securing arm) or in a trachea choke, as their neck is viced between the two legs.

As seen in the video above, it can result in unconsciousness if a tap is not quick enough. The problem for the top man is the fact that their arms can end up being tied up by the bottom mans legs and stuck underneath them, making the action of tapping difficult (also resulting in a tighter hold that is less likely to be escaped).

If anyone has any links to instructionals on this, I'd appreciate it.
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bas Rutten Neck Crank

Okay all. For tonight we have on display the Bas Rutten Neck Crank. This is one of Bas' own creations, and can be obtained from side control off of a Judo Scarf Hold/Wrestler's Head-and-arm pin.

Instructional and application vid HERE

This isn't completely a Neck Crank per se, but there is definitely a bit of cranking on the head that occurs. To execute the hold, you secure a standard judo scarf hold on your opponent, with your wrapping (scarf) arm hooked on the inside of your thigh/knee. Once there, reach back and underhook your opponent's near leg under the knee with you other arm, and secure your grip on the inside of your thigh/knee. At that point, you want to begin begin squeezing your arms and knees together. The action of squeezing your knees together will provide a lot of leverage and power to the hold.

What ends up happening is that your opponent's body will end up folding up into a cradle position around your body. The head of your opponent will be forced forward into their chest (like a neck crank), while the rest of their upper body and torso is compacted down. The neck crank alone has a slow strangulation effect (due to the neck being in a position it's not supposed to be), but since the body is also being compacted upon itself, your lungs and diaphragm don't have the room to fill properly with air. The opponent will tap due to being slowly suffocated, on top of the fact that their neck and torso and lower back are being compressed into a very uncomfortable position.

Admittedly, Bas has stated that this is not a hold to slap onto someone right at the beginning of a fight. It is actually most effective when the opponent has worked for a while and is starting to get tired, as this is the time that their body will really be starving for oxygen.
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Heel Hook

Now for something a bit more basic or traditional as submission holds go. I give you the Heel Hook.

Application Vid Here
Instructional Vid Here

The Heel Hook is a mainstay in Submission Wrestling and MMA, and is a very potentially damaging hold. So much so that it is not allowed in competitive ***** and Brazilian Ju-Jitsu competitions. The hold applies great amounts of torque on the opponents ankle, and in turn transfers the torque into the knee joint. As such, not only is the possibility of dislocation of the ankle greatly present, but so is ligament damage to the knee due to the tibia and fibula of the lower leg torquing out and away from the knee joint.

To apply the heel hook, one entangles their opponent's legs as they would your Achilles Ankle Lock/Ju-Jitsu Footlock, and locks the opponents toes into their armpit. Once their, they secure a hold around the opponent's heel "hooking" it with the blade of their forearm at the base of the heel in a dual-hand grip. At that point, the pressure is created by the lifting action of their arms, and the twisting of their body laterally toward the direction of the shoulder opposite the location of the opponent's leg. Since the opponent's body and leg can not follow the motion of torque, pressure is placed on their ankle and knee.

On a side note, I believe the person in the instructional vid is Erik Paulson. He does a lot of instructional training, it currently listed on Bjj.org as a blue belt, and I believe he started out as a Student of Jeet Kune Do an went on to include judo, boxing, taekwondo, and muay Thai. He began training in BJJ in 1989, and is a regular columnist for Grappling magazine.
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Arm Bar

If there was a contest to determine the King of Submission Holds, the armbar would be running at the front of the pack with the Rear Naked Choke. There are numerous versions of the armbar, from the Waki-Gatame (armpit armlock), Ude-Gatame (straight armlock), to Hiza Gatame (knee armlock), but I was to address the Juji-Gatame (Cross-Armlock).



This is the basic armbar that is a staple submission hold in MMA and many grappling arts, so much so that when one usually refers to a win via "armbar" that they are usually mentioning a submission coming from the Juji-Gatame. The greatest strength of the Juji-Gatame is that it is extremely versatile and can be applied from a great variety of positions: the guard, the mount, sidemount, the back, standing or even from "flying" positions.

The armbar works by securing the movement of your opponent with your legs. One leg isolates the movement of the opponent's body away from the extended limb, while the other isolates the movement of the opponent's head. Once the opponent's arm is in position, and their elbow is secured across your hip or leg, the submission pressure is created by arching the hips up against the range of movement of the elbow. This can result in muscle, tendon and ligament damage, even dislocation, or bone fractures.

Instruction on how to apply the Juji-Gatame from the top by Gokor Chivichyan here.

Instruction on how to apply the Juji-Gatame from the bottom by Cesar Gracie here.

Rumina Sato's infamous flying armbar on Charles Taylor here.

The helicopter armbar can be seen here.
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Kneebar

You can think of the kneebar as the armbar's cousin from "down south." Sure they may behave in some of the same ways, but they definitely get things done differently.



The kneebar is applied similarly to the armbar (juji-gatame), where your entangle the opponent's leg between your own with their knee facing you, making sure to place your hips as far up their leg as possible, while controlling their foot/ankle with your hands/arms. While pulling back on the opponent's foot and arching your hips forward, the opponent's leg will straighten. Further pressure from you hips while continually pulling back with the arms will then cause the leg to lever further against the knee causing hyperextension.

The kneebar is also a very versatile submission hold as it can be done from the mount, while passing the guard, within the half-guard, or while the opponent is on your back (if they've not kept track of where their leg is). It can be a hard hold to secure due to the legs being a powerful body part to control, but its effectiveness is unquestioned.

Ken Shamrock's kneebar on Bas Rutten seen here. Funny thing on this, is that I noticed that Ken sets up the kneebar in Bas' half-guard by threatening a keylock. In one of Bas' instructional videos, he shows how to do the exact same thing (and it works like a charm--I know).

Frank Shamrock shows how to apply the kneebar from the half-guard here.

Frank Shamrock showing how to apply a rolling kneebar from the bottom here.

Erik Paulsen showing multiple variations of the standing kneebar if the opponent threatens taking your back here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CopperShark

·
Crazy Kicker
Joined
·
957 Posts
ya im gunna try that at grappling class today thx
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cool... I'll be adding to this as the weekend passes. I've got an ISP back at the house now, so I can start posting in my fora in earnest.
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The Kimura



The "Kimura" is actually an "underarm" or reverse version of the ude-garami, which is the Judo/Ju-Jitsu "entangled armlock." It was named so by the founders of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu after Masahiko Kimura defeated Helio Gracie via the hold (pictured above) after 13 minutes had lapsed in their challenge bout. Helio's arm is bent to an extreme degree and is fully dislocated from his shoulder in that picture. However, Helio refused to submit which prompted Carlos Gracie (Helio's older brother) to throw in the towel in order to prevent any further injury.

The Kimura can be applied from the mount, side control, or from the guard. Other versions can begin their application from a standing position, but always finishes on the ground. When the Kimura is applied the opponent's wrist is grabbed with the hand on the same side, and the opposite arm is put on the back side the opponent's arm, and again grabbing the attacker's wrist and forming a figure-four. By controlling the opponent's body and cranking the arm away from the attacker, pressure is put on the shoulder joint, and depending on the angle, also the elbow joint (in some variations the opponent's arm is brought behind his back, resulting in a finishing position resembling that of the "hammerlock."

Personally, I find this to be one of my favorite holds to threaten or use to attack. If you can't finish the opponent with this hold, it is very possible to transition into an armbar, biceps slicer, arm triangle, or use it to gain a more dominant position (moving from side control into full mount, moving from full mount into back mount). It has been used by great success by such fighters as Fedor Emelianenko, Kazushi Sakuraba, Matt Hughes and Karo Parisyan.

Videos:
Instructional on a Kimura from the guard here.
Sakuraba demonstrating the Kimura from a standing switch here.
Sakuraba executing that standing switch into Kimura on Renzo at the end of this video here.
A bad dislocation from a Kimura off a reverse triangle hold can be seen here.
 

·
True Grappler
Joined
·
6,222 Posts
Omoplata Variation

Don't have any video on this one, when I get my hands on a camera you'll get the video.

From an omoplata twist so that you are even with your opponent, almost in position for an armbar. Grap the palm of your opponents hand and twist it counterclockwise (the thumb should be turning towards their feet) while twisting your hips in the oposite direction.

Depending on your leverage and position this can target the shoulder or the upper back.
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The Triangle Choke



First exposed to the majority of fledgling MMA fans (at the time NHB fans) by Royce Gracie's victory over San Severn in UFC 4 was the wonders of the Triangle Choke. The triangle has its root deep in Japanese Ju-Jitsu and Judo where it is known as the Sankaku-jime, and has garnered a deep breadth of modern exposure as one of the most effective finishing holds in MMA. It's name is derived by the "triangle" that is formed by the attackers legs.

The Triangle choke is a carotid/blood choke. More correctly, it is a strangle hold that cuts off blood circulation to the brain by restricting the flow of blood through the coratid arteries by placing pressure on the victom's neck via the attacker's leg on one side, and the victom's own shoulder on the other.

When commonly applied from the gaurd, the attacker will place one of their legs over and around one side of their opponent's neck, while controlling their opponent's arm on the opposite side. As they bring that leg over the back side of the opponent's neck, they lock that legs foot in the crux of the knee on their other leg in a "figure four" (creating the triangle) around the opponent's head and shoulder. The attacker will then drape their opponent's trapped arm across their neck, making the hold very tight and hard to escape. To finish, the attacker will then squeeze their legs together and use their hands to lever their opponent's head down. This causes the carotid arteries on both sides of the opponent's neck to collapse, cutting off the blood supply to their brain, which will in turn prompt their opponent to tap in submission or succumb to unconsciousness.

Personally speaking, I'm a big fan of the Triangle choke. Ask anyone what it is like to be caught in one, and you'll probably get a response akin to, "The top of my head felt like it was about to explode through my skull, and then I started to see stars..." One word of advice, if you ever decide to teach this hold to anyone, make sure that you're executing it on them first. Better yet, have another person available for the hold to be put on. I remember blacking out in the middle of teaching my nephew how to lock this one... I didn't get really concerned until after I thought about it. :(

Istructional vid on the Triangle choke from Dean Lister here.

More Triangle choke how to in this vid here.

A Sankaku Jime finish in competition Judo can be seen here.

Hideo Tokoro choking out Yoshinori Ikeda via Triangle choke here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
my fav thread on this forum has just got better i love the triangle i think its an amazing choke. and all the subs are disscussed very well keep up the awsome work dude:D
 

·
Outta My Head
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Another "Conventional" Entry...

The Achilles "Ankle" Lock aka Straight Foot Lock



This is a personal favorite of mine. I personally refer to this as "the giant killer" due to the fact that I've caught many of my taller buddies in this one. Besides, nothing makes you taller than your opponent than leaving them laying on the ground unable to stand as you walk away from it all.

The Achilles Ankle Lock/Straight Foot Lock is a leg submission that creates pressure on the opponent's ankle joint by flexing it beyond its normal range of motion. Also, due to the placement of your forearm on the opponent's leg, it can also create a compression hold by compressing the Achille's tendon at the base of the ankle. Not only does the hold carry a risk of dislocation, hyperflexion and joint damage, it can create a great deal of pressure directly on the Achille's tendon which can (in extreme cases) cause tendon and ligament damage up to and including seperation of the Achille's tendon and heel bone. As damaging as this submission hold can be, it is considered by many a rather safe hold to use in regular training (under controlled restraint) as there are definite varying degrees of pain associated with the hold. This is in stark contrast to the Heel Hook, where the pain associated with the hold is usually indicative of already damaged joints.

To execute the Achilles Lock, one entangles their opponent's leg like they would in a Heel Hook and secures their opponent's foot under their armpit. Once there, you slide your forearm on the same side as your opponent's leg up into the crux of their ankle and turn the blade of the forearm into the Achille's Tendon (thus the name of the hold), and secure it by creating a figure four with your arms on their legs. The hand that you are using to secure their foot will lock onto the wrist of your far-side arm, and the hand of your far-side arm will wrest on your opponent's shin. Once secured, if you bridge up with your hips while pulling your arms upwards and away from your chest, you opponent's foot will flex against your forearm beyond it's normal range of motion and pressure will be created on your opponent's Achille's tendon as it is resting on blade of your forearm. At that point, it is all a matter of snap, crackle, tap...

I couldn't find any definitive instructional vids, but I did find a few good ones. Here they go:

Scissor takedown into ankle lock
The ankle lock set up off of a low kick
A set of submissions off of a caught kick (including the ankle lock)
Shinya Aoki showing off his "akirasuken gatame" ankle lock variation
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,785 Posts
achilles lock is very very hard to catch someone in. heel hook is way way easier but if you have an achilles lock locked in youve got a tap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
Hey guys, someone bring this thread back!!!!

Can I make a request?

That arm choke that Rogan did in that vid and Kampmann used to finish mcfedries
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top