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In my experience, the only way to get better is to practice them. Just do drills with a partner, spend a few minutes working on different take downs, and then have your partner do the same thing. Then switch the style of take downs. Also, when you are going for a take down, don't aim to shoot at the guy you are taking down, aim to go right through him. By that I mean bust your hump and drive right through him and then turn or lift. Thats how I was always taught to do it and it worked pretty well. Good luck
 

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Practice, practice, practice...

One thing that was told of me a few years ago is when you commit to a takedown you have to commit 100%. If you make up your mind to go for it just do it. Don't half ass it.
When shooting for a leg takedown, I would also add to really make sure that you set the takedown up. Play with their head, fake an arm drag, strikes, etc.. Also pay attention to your spacing and make sure your shots start close.

Learn tie up and clinch takedowns and throws like bearhugs and what not if you haven't already.

Send me a PM if you need some details.
 

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True Grappler
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Does anyone know of ways to improve ur takedowns ?
Obviously, as has already been said, there's a big, easy one: practice.

But since that's sort of redundant and seems to go without saying, in my opinion, I figure I'll give you something better than that.

  1. Watch when people better than you are working. I'm fortunate in that I get to train with some of the best judoka and wrestlers in the country periodically, and I learn a great deal by taking a little time after class, or when they're teaching, looking through the details and trying to take note of them.
  2. Ask questions. There's really something to be said for a dialogue with respect to any form of training. There are often little details that you'll notice that are very important to doing the techniques effectively, and if you ask, coaches are usually willing to offer insight.
  3. Drill explosiveness. This is a really concrete training tool. I've had the opportunity to work with some good conditioning coaches and, while my conditioning is not even close to the best part of my game, it seems to be universally accepted that the key to good grappling is developing explosiveness.
  4. Practice pummling. There was a long time, before I started to seriously study judo and Greco-Roman, where my takedowns were so-so, but I managed to slam people to the mat purely because I was better at establishing solid hooks. That's the hallmark of good clinch work, not just getting underhooks, but making sure they're deep.
  5. Think about set-ups. This has already been mentioned, but there are so many guys in MMA and grappling who I've smashed because they think that their wrestling is good enough that they can just shoot. No wrestling is good enough that you can just straight shoot. The set-ups are key to a good takedown, and keep you from walking into submissions and strikes.
  6. Train hard. This seems to go without saying, too, but people forget that drilling explosiveness into the takedown isn't going to happen. There are a lot of grapplers who practice their techniques slowly, and that's good to start, but there is a point at which one needs to start drilling the takedowns with some serious vigor. Watch great judoka do uchi-komi and you'll see what I'm talking about. In submission fighting, there is room for patience and working slowly, and there's room for that in the early stages of wrestling and judo, but it does need to become a high-intensity endeavor at some point in order to be effective.
 

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penetration is key. imagine your drilling partner is standing on a line. you want to step over that line every time you shoot. Then when your knee drops on your stepping foot, you will have taken him 8 inches to a foot off his mark, making him lose balance. and never shoot without a set up.
 

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all depends on what takedowns you like. are you taking a shot? body clinch? arm drag? snap down sag? guard puller? judo player? my coach recommended me to watching anything by john smith OSU wrestling coach, Rob Hermann is another great one he's olympic greco roman coach, granby school of wrestling, marcelo garcia for arm drags, leo vieria has some great takedowns. all depends on your goal.
 
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