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From UFC.com

By Michael DiSanto

After a couple of months of watching Shonie Carter prance around in bikini underwear and the drama of Jeremy Jackson throwing away the biggest opportunity of his career because he couldn’t keep his libido in check, we are closing in on the fourth installment of “The Ultimate Fighter” Finale on November 11th.

This season’s welterweight final features the two pre-tournament favorites, Chris Lytle and Matt Serra, in what should be an action-packed fan-friendly affair. Not only will the pair fight their hearts out for the dream opportunity of facing the winner of Matt Hughes and Georges St. Pierre for the UFC Welterweight Championship, the winner also receives a cool $100,000 in cash, by far the biggest payday of their up-and-down careers, and a one-year, $100,000 Xyience sponsorship.

At its core, this is the classic match up of contrasting styles between Serra, the submission expert, versus Lytle, a heavy-handed striker. The fighter that is able to dictate where the fight unfolds will certainly have an overwhelming advantage.

Here are each gladiator’s keys to victory:

Down the middle, not over the top, is the highway to heaven

Three things in life are absolutely certain: death, taxes and Serra cannot outstrike Lytle. If this fight remains on the feet, Lytle will make good on his moniker “Lights Out” by sending Serra into the realm of the unconscious. The Indianapolis resident is 13-1-1 with seven knockouts as a professional boxer, something he does in between mixed martial arts fights to stay sharp. Now, he isn’t going to be fighting Joe Calzaghe anytime soon for the super middleweight boxing championship, but there isn’t a UFC welterweight than has better hands than Lytle.

The one flaw, however, in Lytle’s boxing game is his tendency to throw his overhand right in a clubbing, over-the-top motion. And when he his charging forward, the clubbing motion becomes more of a slapping strike. The net effect is that Lytle telegraphs the extremely long, looping punch, which opens the door for Serra to slip it and secure a takedown. But when Lytle throws his right hand down the middle, it is a legitimate howitzer, capable of bringing an instantaneous end to the action.

Tax early, spend late

When the two fighters stand opposed in the Octagon, it will be instantly clear that Lytle has a significant size advantage. Sure, both men will tip the scales at or near the welterweight limit, but Lytle has the much larger physical frame, including significant height and reach advantages.

Lytle needs to use those advantages, combined with his striking superiority, to keep the fight at a distance early. By landing kicks and his good, snapping jab, he can start to break down Serra, sapping him of strength and energy. When the bulldog-like Serra gets frustrated, he will start to charge in or dive in with desperation takedown attempts. Lytle can fire knees and uppercuts to exact more damage in those situations, softening up his Serra even more.

With Serra getting more and more desperate to take the fight to the ground, his hands will drop lower and lower, allowing Lytle to land his right hand bomb in search of a second or third round stoppage.

Size matters until the fight hits the ground

Although Serra is a smallish welterweight, he is a giant once the fight hits the ground. The Gracie taught submission expert is a master at ground positioning. And unlike some of his Gracie predecessors, he has a very, very good ground-and-pound attack, which makes him even more dangerous with his ultra-slick submissions.

Keep in mind, though, that Lytle is no ground novice. He has a solid wrestling base and is well versed both in submissions and submission defense. So it is unlikely that he will haphazardly expose his neck or a limb for a submission. With that said, his ground game pales in comparison to “The Terror.”

Because of the striking and size differential, Serra needs to do everything possible to get the fight to the ground and keep it there. Of course, he must set up his takedown attempts with feints or be willing to eat a few shots while boring in. Serra’s granite chin means that he can actually exchange a few punches on the feet with the better boxer in order create opportunities to feint and shoot.

At the end of the day, Serra must shoot early and shoot often, or otherwise do whatever is necessary to get this fight to the canvas.

Risk everything for the ultimate reward

Lytle’s physical and striking advantages make it very likely that Serra will find himself getting impaled on the feet or defending big elbows from his guard once the action hits the ground. But he has a massive heart, so quitting won’t be an issue. Still, he must dig down deep, relying heavily on that heart to throw caution to the wind at calculated times to go for broke with any submission attempts that present themselves.
REST OF THE STORY HERE
 

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good read, thx.... i couldnt agree with what they said more, im pulling for Matt Serra,he has some dam good ground/game and submissions, and plus i think his school is located here in NYC Bklyn... wouldnt mind taking some BJJ lessons from him but in the standup/striking department def. goes to the Boxer Lytles

i def. like Matt better as a LW rather then WW, and i remember his match with GOMI, ever since then he impressed me alot, because GOMI is my #1 LW of the WORLD, god that SOB is nasty
 

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Hammer Fist Elbow
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If you look at Lytle he has some serious ground skill finishing most of his fights with submissions. Lytle has a big advantage in this fight because I think he's coming in more hungry and powerful then Serra will. Seeing Lytles fight in the Semi's I knew he was going to beat the finalist. Dont be fooled by my name I know when someone is going to lose. Lytle for the win in the second round by rear naked choke or armbar.
 

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F*ck You I Rhyme Better
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Matt_Serra_Fan said:
If you look at Lytle he has some serious ground skill finishing most of his fights with submissions. Lytle has a big advantage in this fight because I think he's coming in more hungry and powerful then Serra will. Seeing Lytles fight in the Semi's I knew he was going to beat the finalist. Dont be fooled by my name I know when someone is going to lose. Lytle for the win in the second round by rear naked choke or armbar.

lmfao at your name then your response..

funny man.. i was expectin the opposite from you bud..

anyway i think serra will pull it off
 
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